Messe Düsseldorf North America - Trade Show Daily

The Top Ten of 2011

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Wed, Dec 7, 2011 @ 11:42 AM

describe the image        Well, here we are – December already.  I don’t know about you, but the past year has disappeared faster than anticipated.  And I haven’t done any Christmas shopping yet.  I think a heretofore snowless Chicago has made it feel like an extended autumn…at least that’s what that bowl of still uneaten Halloween candy sitting on top of the refrigerator makes me think.

Overall, it was a busy year for us at Messe Duesseldorf.  Several of our industry-leading events were held in Germany this year:  boot Düsseldorf, EuroShop, interpack, GIFA-METEC-THERMPROCESS-NEWCAST, MEDICA, COMPAMED … and drupa and wire / Tube are just around the corner in 2012.

These events of the past year have made me reflect about a combination of commonly asked questions and exhibitor pitfalls I’ve observed.  I’ve boiled them down to the Top 10 - hopefully without offense to David Letterman and Worldwide Pants!

Cue the drum roll...
                   describe the image
                                   Sorry Dave!

# 10     European electricity is supplied at 220/230 V.  In the U.S. we operate at 110/120 V.  So if you plug in your own stuff without a step-down transformer, don’t be surprised if it reacts like a sparkler on the Fourth of July.

# 9       Entrance passes / name badges for our shows in Germany are not linked to a lead retrieval system, at least not yet anyway.  They’re used primarily for entry to the fairgrounds, secondly as a means of identification, and thirdly…

# 8       Entrance passes / name badges are also tickets to ride the public transportation network.  Some shows’ tickets are only valid within the city of Duesseldorf (VRR), other shows are valid beyond the city’s borders (VRS).  But make sure in advance that you know which zones are covered for your specific show in order to avoid an awkward very public discussion with a German conductor in front of a train car full people.

# 7       Yes, there’s wireless internet access at the fairgrounds, and we have a highly-rated official supplier.  However I’ve learned anecdotally that there are other reputable German wireless companies who provide competitive service (and sometimes temporary trial offers) that can be booked online. I’m just sayin’, that’s all.

# 6       Europeans don’t do “Pop-Up” display stands like we do at shows in the U.S.  If you plan to ship your Pop-Up to the show, you should still plan to order a modular system stand package (walls, carpet, electricity, basic furnishings) and then assemble the pop-up within the booth.  Remember, system stands in Germany are customary – without one you’ll probably stand out for the wrong reasons.

# 5       Bring ALL of your documentation and order confirmations with you to the show!  Nothing says wild goose chase more than not knowing which service provider is building your booth, supplying your booth furnishings, or which freight forwarding company was used to send your freight to Duesseldorf.

# 4 
      Make sure your bills are paid in full before you head over to Germany and avoid the walk of shame to the cashier counter in the service center because your electricity hasn’t been turned on.  Messe Düsseldorf North America is here to assist you in deciphering your invoices and to make sure that nothing falls thru the cracks.  And don’t be alarmed, we’ll be happy to remind you in good time before the show starts of any open balances!

# 3       Listings in the show’s catalogue are not necessarily free.  Unlike trade shows in the U.S., most of our events in Germany allow you to only have an alphabetical listing in the show catalogue and single index listing at the back of the directory.  Anything else you usually have to pay for – that’s just how the catalogue’s publisher rolls.

# 2       Social media has come into increased prominence especially within the past year.  Acquaint yourself with the available technologies – and know the show’s Twitter handle.  Promote your company before, during, and after the show.  Take advantage in advance of the promotional exhibitor materials.   Face it – this is the way things are going and just sitting in your booth hoping everyone will just come to visit is probably not going to cut the mustard, unless Jennifer Aniston is sitting there with you for some reason.          describe the image
Gratuitous picture of TV & Film Star, Jennifer Aniston.

#1
       Pay attention to deadlines!  We know that all this registration and ordering is essentially an administrative task, easily pushed to the back burner. But missing a deadline can mean the difference between getting or not getting a booth in a show, or having to pay a surcharge for a booth order.

Sometimes things at trade shows can go awry for any number of reasons, but always keep in mind that our number one priority is to make sure that you get the assistance that you need as quickly and efficiently as possible, and to make sure that the pieces are put in place so that you have the best trade show possible!  Remember, we’re here to help!

Enjoy the holidays!

Topics: MEDICA, Messe Duesseldorf, exhibiting, International Trade Shows, Exhibitor Badges, Compamed, interpack, Social Media, exhibit booth, drupa, Top 10

Dusting Off an Old Chestnut

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Fri, Sep 9, 2011 @ 13:14 PM

This article was originally posted in September 2009, and is now back by popular demand as the fall trade show season kicks into high gear!

System Stand or:
How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Booth

You know as surely as the swallows return to San Juan Capistrano every spring and the Chicago Cubs don't make it to the World Series in the fall (sigh), a common discussion that arises every year has to do with a company's approach to its booth setup options at our trade shows in Düsseldorf.

The space has been reserved, flights have been booked, and hotels have been selected. Now it's time to start thinking about how you'd like to present your company's public face at the show.

So you say you have a nifty pop-up display that unfolds out a plastic case? That's a good start. Just need some carpet and maybe an information counter and a bar stool or two to complete the ensemble, right? Looks just fine at the U.S. trade shows, why not in Düsseldorf?

You might want to think twice.

After all, you've made this huge investment to participate at this European trade show, and you want to make sure that you put your best foot forward. But in reality what looks fine against a backdrop of pipe and drape in the U.S. might in reality stand out for entirely different reasons at a German trade show.

In a nutshell: Europeans don't do "pop-up" like companies from North America do. Hence, you don't see much of it over there. In fact, the European approach to exhibiting trends more elaborate and more formal than here. The prevalent view is that the booth is by virtue and extension of the company - the place of business for the week, conducted in as formal a business setting as the show floor permits.

That said, the generally accepted minimum standard of booth design is that referred to by Messe Düsseldorf as a "system stand". Priced by the square meter, these elemental stands consist of panel walls, carpet, table and chairs, company sign above the booth, spot lights and an electrical outlet. This simple concept allows the exhibitor to save on shipping costs (keep the pop-up at home and just send over some graphics) and still decorate and setup shop as you like.

And if you really, really dig your pop-up stand and still want to use it, by all means send it on over and set it up within the confines of your system stand!

Messe Düsseldorf North America can advise you on your booth options and prevailing trends in booth design. Let us know how we can assist you in making your participation at one of our shows the best it can be!

Topics: MEDICA, Messe Duesseldorf, Trade Show Planning, Compamed, exhibit booth, stand construction, Stand Design

Enhance your Booth. Enhance your Trade Show Experience.

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Fri, Sep 3, 2010 @ 10:23 AM

We’ve all seen them, perhaps been one of them in fact:  that sad little booth with almost nothing in it.  Perhaps a few brochures set out on a draped table, the empty boxes tucked beneath or stuck back in the corner.  Maybe even the booth representative isn’t there, perhaps walking the show floor.

The investment of time and money has been made to get the space and get to the show, but it appears nevertheless that the company is operating on a shoe-string budget, and it shows - even if it really might not be.

There are many reasons why companies choose to participate in a trade show, but the bottom line is that you’re looking to put your best foot forward and make the biggest splash that you can.  First impressions count.

At our trade shows in Düsseldorf, instead of pipe-and-drape schemes, we offer booth construction packages – known as system stands.  They come with the basic elements and you do the rest!  Even in the US Pavilions that we organize, the same procedure applies.

Take a basic package and turn it into something special, something that reflects your company’s corporate image, and something that reflects your marketing strategy.  Some things you can do to give your booth that extra “oomph” include:

  • Affix graphics to the walls
  • Have your company logo placed on the sign above your booth
  • Order a video monitor to play a looping company DVD
  • Get a free-standing literature rack for easy access to your company brochures
  • Green it up!  Get a plant or two.
  • Display cases brighten up your booth and make it easier to view your product samples
  • Bring multiple product samples and brochures
  • Have some “give-aways” available, even perhaps just a few for VIP visitors
describe the image describe the image
Go from this... ...to that!

Just a few simple upgrades can make all the difference in the results of your trade fair participation.

Messe Düsseldorf North American can advise you on your booth options and prevailing trends in booth design.  Let us know how we can assist you in making your participation at one of our trade shows the best it can be!

Topics: Germany, MEDICA, trade show, Messe, Messe Duesseldorf, exhibiting, Düsseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, medical trade show, medical trade fair, international medical trade fair, International Trade Shows, North American Pavilion, Trade Show Planning, exhibit booth, stand construction, Stand Design, U.S. Pavilion, booth construction, display booth, show, show collection

System Stand or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Booth

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Fri, Sep 25, 2009 @ 11:41 AM

You know as surely as the swallows return to San Juan Capistrano every spring and the Chicago Cubs don't make it to the World Series in the fall (sigh), a common discussion that arises every year has to do with a company's approach to its booth setup options at our trade shows in Düsseldorf.

The space has been reserved, flights have been booked, and hotels have been selected. Now it's time to start thinking about how you'd like to present your company's public face at the show.

So you say you have a nifty pop-up display that unfolds out a plastic case? That's a good start. Just need some carpet and maybe an information counter and a bar stool or two to complete the ensemble, right? Looks just fine at the U.S. trade shows, why not in Düsseldorf?

You might want to think twice.

After all, you've made this huge investment to participate at this European trade show, and you want to make sure that you put your best foot forward. But in reality what looks fine against a backdrop of pipe and drape in the U.S. might in reality stand out for entirely different reasons at a German trade show.

In a nutshell: Europeans don't do "pop-up" like companies from North America do. Hence, you don't see much of it over there. In fact, the European approach to exhibiting trends more elaborate and more formal than here. The prevalent view is that the booth is by virtue and extension of the company - the place of business for the week, conducted in as formal a business setting as the show floor permits.

That said, the generally accepted minimum standard of booth design is that referred to by Messe Düsseldorf as a "system stand". Priced by the square meter, these elemental stands consist of panel walls, carpet, table and chairs, company sign above the booth, spot lights and an electrical outlet. This simple concept allows the exhibitor to save on shipping costs (keep the pop-up at home and just send over some graphics) and still decorate and setup shop as you like.

And if you really, really dig your pop-up stand and still want to use it, by all means send it on over and set it up within the confines of your system stand!

Messe Düsseldorf North America can advise you on your booth options and prevailing trends in booth design. Let us know how we can assist you in making your participation at one of our shows the best it can be!


Topics: trade show, exhibiting, Düsseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, exhibit booth, stand construction, booth construction, display booth