Messe Düsseldorf North America - Trade Show Daily

FPSA and Messe Duesseldorf Form Strategic Alliance

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Wed, Dec 1, 2010 @ 15:22 PM

McLean, Virginia based FPSA (The Food Processing Suppliers Association) is a global trade association serving suppliers in the food and beverage industries. The Association's programs and services support its members by providing assistance in marketing their products and services, overall improvement in key business practices and many opportunities to network among industry colleagues.  Among the association's programs and services to achieve these objectives is PROCESS EXPO, The Global Food Equipment and Technology Show.

Messe Düsseldorf GmbH and The FPSA recently announced the formation of a formal strategic alliance to increase the international reach of PROCESS EXPO as part of interpack’s worldwide product family.

Messe Duesseldorf will aid in the sale of booth space at PROCESS EXPO as well as well as promoting visitor attendance to food processors around the globe.

FPSA and MD shake hands

Pictured from left to right:  Bernd Jablonowski (Project Director, interpack 2011), Hans Werner Reinhard (Executive Vice President, Messe Duesseldorf GmbH), Jan Erik Kuhlmann (President & CEO, Multivac), David Seckman (President & CEO, FPSA).

The renowned interpack trade fair, organized by Messe Duesseldorf, was founded in 1958 and developed over the decades into the number one global platform for the packaging and processing industry.  The last staging of the show in 2008 featured 2,744 exhibitors from 60 nations and attracted 179,000 trade visitors.

“This partnership will significantly increase the presence of PROCESS EXPO in the international market, where Messe Duesseldorf is a leader within the processing and packaging trade show arena,” stated Scott Scriven, Chairman of FPSA. “With 7 international subsidiaries and 68 foreign representatives worldwide supporting Messe Duesseldorf in 127 countries, PROCESS EXPO will have unprecedented access to new markets,” he added.

 “Messe Duessseldorf is pleased to be joining with FPSA in the formation of this partnership. The exponential growth of PROCESS EXPO since the announcement of the move to a biennial show tells us that strategically, this is where we need to be in the North American market. We are now pleased to offer our existing customers a new platform,” added Hans Werner Reinhard, Executive Vice President of Messe Duesseldorf.

PROCESS EXPO will be held November 1-4, 2011 at the McCormick Place Convention Center in Chicago, Illinois.  www.myprocessexpo.com

interpack will return to the fairgrounds in Duesseldorf, Germany May 12-18, 2011.  www.interpack.com

Topics: Announcements, Germany, trade show, Messe, international, Messe Duesseldorf, international business, Düsseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, Exports, International Trade, International Trade Shows, trade fair, trade show organizer, Chicago, packaging, interpack, show, FPSA, Food Processing Suppliers Association, food packaging

Valve World Expo

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Fri, Oct 29, 2010 @ 16:04 PM

From abominable snowmen to Indiana Jones - Installation work offers curious and exciting experiences

Valves control lots of things, whether in industrial plants and machines or in a private household. They fulfil their duties as a matter of course and – for most of us – nearly invisibly. However, the stories that can be told about valves are not utterly boring, in some cases they are even real tales of adventure. Installing valves can often be extremely demanding for the technicians – and the valves themselves become “silent” stars.

Two abominable snowmen

Schroeder Valves can tell such as story. The design engineer and manufacturer of pump protection valves, automatic recirculation valves, control valves and throttles has sales offices around the globe. “The products are nearly entirely special designs, which sometimes can be as large as a room or weigh as much as an elephant,” explains Axel Muecher, CEO of Schroeder Valves. Not only are the valves special, but so are the different environments where they are installed. Schroeder Valves, for example, equips snow cannons in many skiing regions with its fittings. It can often happen that an employee has to work at over 3,000 meters altitude. However such work is only worth a weary smile…

“There is one job we’ll certainly never forget,” Axel Muecher remembers. He travelled to the Austrian town of Tauplitz with a colleague to repair a defect bypass in a valve. Heavy snowfall created pretty scenery down in the valley, yet also caused both mechanics to become anxious. They set off in a car fitted with snow chains, yet after driving half of the way the car couldn’t go any further. The customer arranged for a snow cat to bring them up to an altitude of 2,800 meters. Both thought that would be a great idea - until they noticed the snow cat’s cab was already occupied by two other men. “We had no other choice than to sit on the hood,” says Axel Mücher. Sitting outside at minus 10°C, the snow cat drove them one and a half kilometers through a near snow storm to their assignment. On arrival, Muecher and his colleague resembled abnominable snowmen. “And that’s exactly how we felt ourselves.” All is well that ends well – the bypass was repaired!

Installing in the wild

Nonetheless, things can be a lot more spectacular, as Frank Loeffler can tell. The mechanic working for VAG-Armaturen GmbH had to travel 18,000 kilometers to the wild outback of Tasmania. Far away from civilization, Loeffler had to struggle along a mountain, across rocky terrain and through bothersome vegetation to install a shut-off valve for a historical wooden water conduit at a dam. The conduit is a real historical beauty. Back in 1914, the Lyell Mining and Railway Company built a dam for a power station, right at the foot of Lake Margret, near Queenstown and its 2,000 inhabitants. A three kilometer long water conduit was built to supply a mine with electricity and water. Nearly nine decades later the entire construction was shut down temporarily so the wooden conduit could be renovated, because its wood had become porous.

Frank Loeffler wasn’t the only one who had to cope with the rocky path leading to the dam. VAG also had to come up with a way to transport the valve, since there was no road a truck could use to deliver it. A helicopter was the only solution. VAG disassembled the valve into its individual parts, because the 3.5 ton valve would have been too heavy for a helicopter. Body, valve disk and lift cylinder were to be transported to the dam in three flights. To make things worse, neither electricity nor a crane would be available, so exactly what tools, hoisting and alignment gear would be needed for this job had to be determined in advance. Due to bad weather, the flights were delayed several times. Finally, the shut-off valve was delivered. Loeffler now had to work quickly: the body had to be put into position on top of the new plateau anchored in the rock, the extremely heavy valve had to be aligned and the axle bearings installed. Finally, Frank Loeffler was able to install the hydraulic lift cylinder. It was precision work under the most difficult of circumstances, yet the experienced VAG-employee managed it all without problems. “That was an assignment with an adventure as a bonus,” said the mechanic enthusiastically. “I felt just like Indiana Jones!”

A flurry of flashbulbs

Sometimes there is enough excitement for a valve to hit the news. This was the case for large-diameter ball valves made by Schuck Armaturen. After receiving an express order, the company had to deliver ball valves weighing several tons by plane for the first time to Malaysia. A subsidiary of Petronas, the Malaysian oil and gas giant, had ordered ball valves with a diameter of up to 36” for the world’s largest liquid natural gas terminal. The valves had to be able to withstand 118 bars of pressure. Because the delivery period was rather short, a plane had to pick up the bodies in India where they were cast. Despite their weight of 19.5 tons, the valves were flown as air freight from Frankfurt to Malaysia after they had been assembled. Then it was time for the big show – for the first time ever, a Boeing 747 landed at the small airport of Bintulu in the state of Sarawak, a town with a population of 50,000. Reporters and television crews flocked to the event – no one had ever seen a Boeing before. And thus the ball valves became news in Malaysia, amidst a flurry of flashbulbs…

Vital and essential

On the other hand, valves can be a matter of life and death; for instance, for the inhabitants of Prague’s Old Town. Eight years ago, the Czech Republic witnessed the greatest natural disaster in its history. The waters of the flooded Moldau River pressed into Prague’s sewage, the old town was flooded - with fatal consequences. Seventeen people died, 40,000 had to be evacuated, a large portion of the inhabitants were without electricity, half of city’s subway stations were submerged and many animals drowned in the zoo.

In order to prevent such a disaster in the future, the Czech Republic decided to redesign Prague’s sewage system. VAG-Armaturen now ensures the metropolis‘ safety. The company from Germany shipped parallel slide gate valves and a backflow trap with a nominal diameter of DN 600. Both valves were installed right next to the Moldau. “In case of a flood, the flood water is kept from pressing back into the town’s sewage system,” explains Joachim Reichert of VAG. This not only keeps the citizens safe, but also keeps the subterranean pumping chamber from being damaged.

In addition to the automatic backflow flap, VAG also installed a slide gate valve. This security measure makes it possible to close the pipes if the backflow flap doesn‘t function properly. VAG developed this solution in collaboration with Prague’s water company. The result is essential for the city’s survival!

The world is not enough

In different cases however, the world is not enough for some fittings. Space can be a nice place, too. Stoehr rocketed 56 specially-made valves with nominal diameters ranging from DN 15 to DN 200 into space when they were built into South Korean carrier rocket Naro 1. The valves ensure the rocket is fuelled with liquid gases before lift-off and are an utterly vital part of the 30 meter tall and 141 ton heavy rocket with a diameter of 3.90 meters. The parts have to function absolutely precisely, as they ensure the highly complex fuelling process works without any problem whatsoever. Liquid gases, such as liquid oxygen with a temperature of -196°C, have to flow into their tanks in a matter of seconds. Due to security reasons, fuelling on the Naro Space Centre’s launch pad can only take place as part of the take-off process. Thanks to Stoehr, everything went smoothly. In the end, the space mission was not entirely a success, as the satellite was destroyed. An independent commission declared it was due to the nose cone – parts of it were not released as planned. The rocket didn’t make it into orbit.

Insurgents attack

Valves aren’t the only ones living dangerous lives, mechanics can also be exposed to serious dangers. Two employees working for Schroeder Valves found themselves ambushed in India while travelling by train from Calcutta to a steel plant in Raigarh, where they were supposed to give technical support. The journey was originally expected to last 16 hours. After around half the journey the train passed through the Bhalulata station in the state of Orissa. “We were suddenly woken up by a detonation and deafening noise,” one of the two Schroeder employees remembers. Chaos suddenly broke out. “People ran confused, panicking and shouting. We saw smoke rise.” 50 Maoist rebels had blown up the tracks - as well as parts of the train station – and taken railroad staff as hostages.

“Luckily, things went well for us,” says one of the men from Schroeder. Nonetheless, it was far from being a pleasant experience. Due to the attack, the train and both Germans were stuck in the middle of the jungle for an entire day. In the end, the train travelled backwards to the closest station, where they then had to return to Calcutta. The customer had to be helped by email and spare parts delivery.

So don’t say installation work can be a boring affair…

The latest products and technologies for the valve industry will be on display at the Valve World Expo 2010, to be held from November 30 – December 2 at the fairgrounds in Düsseldorf, Germany.

For further information about Valve World Expo 2010, contact us at Messe Düsseldorf North America, 150 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 2920, Chicago, IL 60601. Telephone: (312) 781-5180; Fax: (312) 781-5188; E-mail: [email protected]; Visit our web site http://www.mdna.com; Subscribe to our blog at http://blog.mdna.com; Follow us on twitter at http://twitter.com/mdnachicago!

Topics: Announcements, Germany, trade show, international, international business, Düsseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, International Trade, International Trade Shows, trade fair, City of Düsseldorf, equipment, valve, Valve World Expo

4½ Football Fields

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Tue, Oct 12, 2010 @ 15:26 PM

2010 is stacking up to be a good year for U.S. companies seeking export markets and participating at Messe Duesseldorf’s trade shows not just in Duesseldorf, but at the company’s satellite trade fairs in other markets, from Brazil and Australia to China, India, Russia and Singapore!

A total of 987 U.S. companies have participated in, or will participate, in our worldwide roster of trade shows in 2010, occupying over 250,000 square feet of net exhibit space – enough to completely fill nearly four and half US-football fields end to end and side to side!

Leading the pack this year, as always, is the renowned MEDICA and COMPAMED trade fairs this November in Duesseldorf.  The show will feature over 420 US-based exhibitors (a 5% increase over 2009), not mentioning the numerous others who participate in the show via European or offices based elsewhere in the world.  Add in 48 companies from Canada and 10 from Mexico at MEDICA and COMPAMED, and the show is the largest contingent of North-American based exhibitors at a medical industry event outside of the western hemisphere!

Other events in Duesseldorf, # 1 worldwide for their respective industries that have occurred this year, included wire/Tube (120 US exhibitors), glasstec (58) and the upcoming K trade fair later this month (112), just to name a few.

Saddled with a sluggish economic recovery at home, exports have proven to be an important way to grow business and stay competitive with growing international competition.  Kudos to these US companies that are actively embracing export market opportunities!

We’ve been showing the way for nearly 30 years!

Since 1982, Messe Düsseldorf North America has been a resource for US companies seeking new international market opportunities.  We have served as an international like to innumerable U.S. companies over the years, assisting with everything necessary to exhibit at or visit one of the trade shows organized by the Messe Düsseldorf group of companies around the world.

For nearly 30 years, MDNA has brought market partners together to ensure that exhibitors and visitors find customers or providers of service and merchandise they are looking for.

Topics: Announcements, Germany, MEDICA, medical, medical components, medical equipment, medical supplies, trade show, Messe, international, Messe Duesseldorf, international business, glass, glass show, exhibiting, K 2010, glasstec, Düsseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, medical trade show, medical trade fair, international medical trade fair, Exports, International Trade, International Trade Shows

solarpeq - The New Trade Fair for the Development of Solar Energy

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Tue, Sep 28, 2010 @ 08:49 AM

Solar energy has increased at a remarkable pace in the United States and throughout the world over the past decade.  The resulting cost per kilowatt-hour of solar PV (photovoltaic) systems has been dropping while electricity generated from traditional fossil fuels has become increasingly expensive.  As a result, industry experts predict that solar power will reach cost parity with conventional power sources in many U.S. markets by 2015.


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In July 2010, the administration of U.S. President Barack Obama announced $2 billion in new investments to help build clean energy technology and create thousands of jobs in the United States.  Industry analysts now believe that the United States and Germany will be the largest PV markets in the world within five years, with expected market growth rates of 20 percent annually.

Embracing these dynamic international market directions, glasstec 2010 will now also cater to an industry segment widely considered to be the world's fastest growing energy technology:  solar energy production.

Under the name solarpeq – International Trade Fair for Solar Production Equipment – this interesting and exciting trade show opened its doors today in Duesseldorf, Germany.  In 2008, the last time glasstec was held and before solarpeq was conceived, over 150 glasstec exhibitors introduced their innovations within the solar/photovoltaic sector, and now this year 250 exhibitors from 30 countries will present their companies and products at the debut of solarpeq.

solarpeq is open to all companies offering process engineering / production equipment for thin film and crystalline PV - from machinery and equipment for the production of solar applications to suppliers of components and raw materials, and will highlight the following product categories:

  • Cell and module production (crystalline and thin-film)
  • Silicon and ingot production
  • Wafer production
  • Components and process-accompanying technology
  • Measurement and testing technology/software
  • Solar glass

Be sure to join us in embracing this technology and this new trade show platform for the production of solar based power:  SOLARPEQ 2010!

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Topics: Announcements, Germany, trade show, Messe, Messe Duesseldorf, glass, glass show, glasstec, Düsseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, International Trade Shows, trade fair, solar, solar technology, solarpeq, PV, photovoltaic

Enhance your Booth. Enhance your Trade Show Experience.

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Fri, Sep 3, 2010 @ 10:23 AM

We’ve all seen them, perhaps been one of them in fact:  that sad little booth with almost nothing in it.  Perhaps a few brochures set out on a draped table, the empty boxes tucked beneath or stuck back in the corner.  Maybe even the booth representative isn’t there, perhaps walking the show floor.

The investment of time and money has been made to get the space and get to the show, but it appears nevertheless that the company is operating on a shoe-string budget, and it shows - even if it really might not be.

There are many reasons why companies choose to participate in a trade show, but the bottom line is that you’re looking to put your best foot forward and make the biggest splash that you can.  First impressions count.

At our trade shows in Düsseldorf, instead of pipe-and-drape schemes, we offer booth construction packages – known as system stands.  They come with the basic elements and you do the rest!  Even in the US Pavilions that we organize, the same procedure applies.

Take a basic package and turn it into something special, something that reflects your company’s corporate image, and something that reflects your marketing strategy.  Some things you can do to give your booth that extra “oomph” include:

  • Affix graphics to the walls
  • Have your company logo placed on the sign above your booth
  • Order a video monitor to play a looping company DVD
  • Get a free-standing literature rack for easy access to your company brochures
  • Green it up!  Get a plant or two.
  • Display cases brighten up your booth and make it easier to view your product samples
  • Bring multiple product samples and brochures
  • Have some “give-aways” available, even perhaps just a few for VIP visitors
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Go from this... ...to that!

Just a few simple upgrades can make all the difference in the results of your trade fair participation.

Messe Düsseldorf North American can advise you on your booth options and prevailing trends in booth design.  Let us know how we can assist you in making your participation at one of our trade shows the best it can be!

Topics: Germany, MEDICA, trade show, Messe, Messe Duesseldorf, exhibiting, Düsseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, medical trade show, medical trade fair, international medical trade fair, International Trade Shows, North American Pavilion, Trade Show Planning, exhibit booth, stand construction, Stand Design, U.S. Pavilion, booth construction, display booth, show, show collection

DOTmed interviews Joachim Schaefer, managing director, Messe Düsseldorf

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Fri, Aug 13, 2010 @ 13:12 PM

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  Barbara Kram, editor of DOTmed News recently conducted an online interview with Joachim Schaefer, the Managing Director of our corporate headquarters in Germany.  Messe Duesseldorf is organizer of the renowned MEDICA and COMPAMED trade fairs, held annually in Duesseldorf, Germany, as well as other leading medical trade shows around the world.
Mr. Joachim Schaefer
Managing Director
Messe Duesseldorf GmbH
       

Below is a transcript of the interview.

DM: Describe your global health care forums. Who are participants? Where are the global hot spots of interest?

JS: Our medical trade fairs target medical users such as doctors and health care professionals, as well as decision-makers from the clinical management sector, medical specialty retail and decision-makers from the medical engineering field. Next to traditional markets with high demand in North America and Europe, the BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) nations, as well as specific markets in the Near East, are characterized by growth. Here the demographic development creates an increase in prosperity and an escalated interest in health and well being, which in turn generates more demand for medical services.

DM: Have recent economic woes in Europe impacted your work or have you seen an impact in the medical technology sector?

JS: Compared to the development in other industries, the medical industry has remained largely unscathed by any dramatic declines in demand. In several markets, for example in Germany and France, the medical industry is even benefiting from economic stimulus packages designed to support the economy. Regardless of the financial and economic crisis, the basic conditions of health policy are much more decisive for the medical sector. In this regard we can ascertain that cost-cutting measures are being implemented in almost all industrial nations in order to ensure continued financing of medical care. While this does affect the demand for medical technical products, the demand volume remains consistently high. At the same time, manufacturers are continually increasing the efficiency of medical treatments and improving the therapy success rate with their innovations. This in turn stimulates demand.

DM: From your global perspective working with suppliers and OEMs in the medical technology sector, what megatrends would you say most significantly affect these markets?

JS: Due to the increasing cost pressure in the health care field, it is more important than ever to ensure that the treatment process is as efficient as possible. This is why digitization is advancing at such a fast pace in both the outpatient and inpatient sectors. Systems are in demand that optimally connect the individual departments and doctors to ensure that the patient workflow is not interrupted by paucity of information. Accelerating precise diagnoses is of course also a major priority. The current trend is toward rapid tests that are executed directly on the patient, as well as compact devices for imaging processes. Both deliver critical images and data to aid in determining further treatment. Telemedical services should also be mentioned here. Although they currently represent a niche market, they will undoubtedly be gaining importance in the near future, for example within the framework of remote care of chronically ill or elderly patients.

DM: What are some of the regional differences in delivery of health care?

JS: There are no basic differences between cultures in regard to technology trends. The approval process, however, can vary greatly. The same applies to the financing of, or the access to innovations. In many markets, innovative methods are reserved for the private health care sector. In the end, good medical treatment for broad sections of the population is dependent on whether and to what extent the government participates in the development of the treatment, whether through tax money or the creation of government-controlled insurance systems. In many countries, including for example the USA, such discussions are currently being held and new health care concepts developed.

DM: Which medical technologies attract the most attention at your shows?

JS: The medical trade fairs organized by the Messe Duesseldorf Group cover the entire treatment process, from laboratory technology and diagnostics to innovative medical technology, physical therapy and orthopedic technology to medical IT. Visitor interest is equally high in all of these main areas.

DM: Is medical tourism, in which patients leave their home countries to seek care in another, a growing or significant trend? Which nations stand to gain or lose in this area?

JS: This is a topic with many facets. Basically, growing globalization and the increase in prosperity, along with the rise in health consciousness, is creating enormous growth potential even in the emerging markets. The winners here will be those who can offer excellent professional knowledge combined with an extraordinary infrastructure. Due to the high density of care and in some cases highly specialized facilities, the European market -- particularly Germany -- as well as of course the USA, are in an excellent starting position. But keep in mind that other nations in growth markets are also preparing for this lucrative competition. Factors such as marketing, quality management and outstanding patient care will become increasingly important alongside purely medical aspects, as will uncomplicated dealings with public authorities.

Topics: Germany, MEDICA, medical, medical components, medical equipment, medical supplies, Messe Duesseldorf, international business, Düsseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, medical trade show, medical trade fair, international medical trade fair, International Trade Shows, trade show organizer

make-up artist design show Duesseldorf 2011

Posted by Brigitte Cox on Thu, Jun 24, 2010 @ 15:08 PM

Trade Fair for Make-up Artists
March 19-20, 2011
Düsseldorf, Germany
www.make-up-artist-show.de

Creative, colorful and vibrant - the make-up artist design show is an all-professional trade show featuring product presentations, talks and seminars that is reserved exclusively for make-up artists. So far only London, England has hosted such an event in Europe for professionals.  make-up artist design show, however, is the only major international trade event covering the European mainland.

At the premiere of the make-up artist design show last March, 1,900 trade visitors came to Düsseldorf to learn from the leaders in the make-up business. A well-attended conference featured international make-up artists from films, TV shows and theater productions, such as Vittorio Sodano, who was nominated for an Academy Award in 2007 and 2010, Barney Burman, Academy Award winner, and Bernd Staatz, head make-up artist for the German Opera am Rhein.

Additionally, two top-notch beauty industry events are held concurrently with make-up artist design show:

BEAUTY INTERNATIONAL DÜSSELDORF 2011
Trade Fair for the Cosmetics, Nail, Foot Care and Wellness Industries
www.beauty-international.com

TOP HAIR INTERNATIONAL DÜSSELDORF
Trade Fair, Show and Congress for the International Hairdressing Industry
www.top-hair-international.de

We hope you’ll be there to expand into new markets and introduce your products to international prospects!

Topics: Germany, trade show, Messe, Düsseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, International Trade Shows, trade fair, beauty, fashion, BEAUTY INTERNATIONAL, Top Hair

So How Did We Do?

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Fri, Jun 18, 2010 @ 13:45 PM

2009 was a pretty tough year for just about everyone – and boy was it ever a stinker and aren’t we all glad it’s behind us…

All things considered, though, the Messe Düsseldorf Group seemed to weather the storm better than predicted.

The nature of our business is cyclical in nature – some of our events are held every four years or three, many are held every two years and several are held annually.  So after the sun, moon, and stars all aligned for part of 2007 and most of 2008 (all of the leading “mega shows” were held in Düsseldorf back to back over an 18 month period), things slowed down as planned – to the tune of around 50% - but with better results than anticipated:  a sales volume of approximately 256 million Euro (approximately US$ 307 million).

Last year’s leading events:  MEDICA, boot, A+A and CARAVAN SALON.

In 2009, Messe Düsseldorf produced a total of 14 self-owned events and hosted 18 partner and guest events at the Düsseldorf fairgrounds.  A total of 21,961 exhibitors (2008: 32,488) presented their products to 1.123 million visitors (2008: 1.964 million). The hall space rented amounted to nearly 10.5 million square feet (2008: approximately 16 million square feet).

On the international trade fair scene, Messe Düsseldorf organized 37 commissioned events and 21 of its own.  Primarily due to the economic downturn in Russia with sales losses of 30%, Messe Düsseldorf closed its international trade fair business year 2009 with sales of Euro 37 million – 25% percent less than in 2008.

So after the 2009 worldwide recession there are now signs of an overall upward trend.  Based on the trade fair cycles, Messe Düsseldorf predicts a sales increase in 2010 compared to last year.  However, the economic recovery still appears slow, it’s still a relatively quiet year in our show cycle with a few exceptions, and so we are expecting as our CEO called it, a "black zero.”

Let’s see how we do!

Topics: Announcements, Germany, international business, Düsseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, International Trade Shows, trade fair, Russia, trade show organizer, Euro

Altstadt

Posted by Brigitte Cox on Mon, Jun 14, 2010 @ 15:22 PM

The ‘Altstadt’ (Old Town) is the historic town center of Düsseldorf.  There is much to see and taste!  Here is a glimpse – then you can explore this wonderful part of town on your own during your visit to Düsseldorf.

On the south side of the Altstadt a quiet and romantic flair prevails, dominated by the Marxkirche (church) and the small, dreamy Citadellstrasse. If you are lucky, you might just catch an organ concert in the beautiful Baroque church. The Citadellstrasse is lined with neoclassical house fronts, looking much as they did during Heinrich Heine’s day.  At its end is the former palace of Count Spee, which houses a part of Düsseldorf’s City Museum.  In Bäckergasse you’ll find a wrought iron gate, behind which is the most romantic park in the city:  the old Palace Park with its stately trees and idyllic Lake.

On Bernrather Strasse is the very lively Karlsplatz, where a market is set up daily. This is the center of Karlstadt in the Altstadt, where you’ll find quite a few 18th century patrician houses.  Cultural institutes, galleries and countless gastronomical possibilities, an active pub scene as well as quiet streets await you here.

At the Marktplatz (market square) you’ll discover the famous monument to Electoral Price Wilhelm von der Pfalz, lovingly called ‘Jan Wellem’ by Düsseldorf’s residents.  Those who seek the hustle and bustle of crowds will find what they are looking for in the streets that lead away from the Marktstrasse and Bergerstrasse:  Boutiques, pubs and taverns where Düsseldorf’s world-famous Altbier (ale) is served.  Here you’ll be able to experience just why Düsseldorf’s old town district is repeatedly referred to as ‘the longest bar counter in the world’.  A surprisingly different atmosphere can be found in the little Schneider-Wibbel-Gasse, a small street filled with Spanish restaurants, one next to the other, which invite you to stop and sample their cuisine.

To finish your tour, take a walk along the Rhine river promenade to enjoy the beautiful view of the Altstadt. The river path is busy with residents, visitors, sunbathers, as well as ship traffic on the Rhine.  The former Stiftsplatz in front of the church with its beautiful old façade is one of the most idyllic squares in Düsseldorf’s Old Town and the Altestadt Strasse is the oldest street in Düsseldorf.  In the Ritterstrasse you’ll find facades from 18th and 19th century homes and – for even a bit more history stop in the Ursulinengasse, where markings show just where the medieval city wall from 1288 ran.

Topics: Germany, Düsseldorf, Travel, City of Düsseldorf, eating in Düsseldorf, visit Dusseldorf, shopping in Dusseldorf

Succeed with us Around the World: A Primer to How We Organize Trade Shows

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Tue, May 25, 2010 @ 12:31 PM

In the United States, many trade shows take place in conjunction with industry conferences, usually under the patronage of a supporting trade association.  The show’s sponsor selects a suitable city in which to hold the trade show, and then negotiates and signs a contact with the city’s convention center or other private venue.  More often than not, show management activities are then jobbed-out to professional show management firms.

We often get asked about how we “do” shows in comparison.  Indeed our system is set up differently in Germany than in the United States, starting with the structuring of the company and its approach to how things are managed.

How WE do it

Düsseldorf Fair GroundsMesse Düsseldorf not only owns and produces many of the events held in Düsseldorf, it also owns and operates the convention center (a.k.a. “The Fairgrounds” or “das Messegelände”) – something unheard of in the U.S.  The Düsseldorf Fairgrounds is one of the world's largest and most modern convention centers, featuring 18 halls offering over 2.5 million square feet of exhibit space.


Shareholders of Messe Duesseldorf include primarily the City of Düsseldorf, along with the German federal st
ate of North Rhine-Westphalia and other affiliated public chambers of commerce and trade.  Dusseldorf’s mayor is the Chairman of the Board, who appoints and oversees the company’s CEO.

The company is structured as a full-service trade show management company – not only does each trade show that we produce have a dedicated team of project management specialists, all related goods and services to the exhibitor are provided under one roof:

  • Facilities Management
  • Traffic and Logistics Control
  • Technical Services
  • Stand Construction
  • Protocol
  • Press and Public Relations
  • IT and Internet Support Services


Since 1947, Messe Düsseldorf has been operating world-class and industry-leading trade shows across a wide variety of industries.  Today, 23 of the 50 events that take place in Düsseldorf are the No. 1 events in their respective industries.

And as the company has grown, so too have its international operations.  We’ve branched out over the years into all major markets, and are now on location in 127 countries, with 66 agencies abroad and more than 1500 employees.

For over 30 years, Messe Düsseldorf North America (MDNA) has been your local partner for trade fairs in Germany and beyond.  We were the first German trade fair company to establish roots here in the United States and for the past 20 years have been based in Chicago.

Succeed with Us Around the World isn’t just our slogan – it’s how WE do business.

Topics: Germany, trade show, international business, Messe Düsseldorf, International Trade Shows, trade fair, Trade Show Planning, City of Düsseldorf, trade show organizer