Messe Düsseldorf North America - Trade Show Daily

Slapped with Snow & Piles of Paper!

Posted by Robert Self on Fri, Feb 20, 2015 @ 11:30 AM

Winter is hard. Few can argue against that. It’s cold. The sun barely shines. Shoveling starts. Delays commence. And cabin fever sets. But despite the numb fingers and all, we would like to give you hope and remind you that brighter days are ahead!

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(Photo: Typical Chicago Winter - 2015)

Now, I don’t know about you, but when winter comes around I just tend to move slower – and we see the same mentality occur in the trade show industry. Sure, the main seasons for trade shows to occur are in early Spring and early Winter, but much planning for these shows occurs… well… now.

There are forms to fill out, documents to sign, invoices to pay, and more! We can’t allow our desire to remain sluggish take over! But when all you want to do is hibernate, how can you possibly keep up the momentum to plan for a show? Simply put, it’s the dedication that goes into a project that allows momentum to forge onward. Let me give you an example:

Two weeks ago our Chicago office was basically slapped by Mother Nature, who thought it funny to dump 19.6 inches of snow on the city - making for our fifth largest blizzard in Chicago’s recorded history.

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(Photo: There's an actual car under there)

But, being the thick-skinned, snow-savvy people we are as Chicagoans, we still trekked out in cold using our streets and the ‘L’ (our public transit system) to get around, as no travel bans were placed. I, for one, was one of those crazies – just out for a casual stroll to my Super Bowl Sunday gathering. NOTHING was going to keep me from the food, friends, football game, food, commercials, food, Katy Perry half-time show, food, and food. And for most Chicagoans alike, it was business as usual. (Granted there were a few… casualties. See: photo of abandoned car).

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(Photo: Abandoned cars remain in middle of Chicago streets
from previous night, blocking plows & tow trucks)

While many Chicago offices, including ours, placed our safety before work and allowed us to remain home considering the danger element, there were still people crowding the streets on Monday morning. Our office in particular saw an amazing turnout. Because we know our shows are time-sensitive projects, and we want to make sure we’re on top of our game. That desire to meet deadlines and to plan ahead for any road bumps we may cross brought us through the tundra and to our computer screens. For you, our exhibitors & visitors.

Here’s another: Currently, our building is experiencing some electrical issues unrelated to our particular office, which has made the heat go out. It is currently -15 degrees Fahrenheit outside our windows, while the west coast parodies what hardship feels like. Once again offered the safety to stay home until the issue is fixed, what did we do? We put on another layer, sucked it up, and came anyway.

You see, problems can come at you from all angles without you ever being able to see it coming (much like weather). But rolling with the punches, remaining optimistic, and most importantly planning ahead allows you to find the solutions. In this particular case the solution just happens to be an extra pair of long underwear.

Basically, any show that we organize for the early Winter season (i.e. September-December) undergoes heavy organizing during this, the dreaded dead depths of the late Winter season (i.e. January-March). But we’re here to send you reminders, give you calls, and motivate you. Many deadlines may be approaching for shows in your industry. So while winter is hard, the sun is rising earlier/setting later. The snow and ice are thawing (at least right before it freezes again). And the first day of Spring is next month! Besides, the groundhog reared his head nearly three weeks ago – so we’re half way out of the woods! So here’s to early planning! And if you ever have questions or doubts, you can always reach out to us! Our contact information is below!

Contact us!
Website: www.mdna.com
Phone: (312) 781-5180
Email: [email protected]
Twitter: @mdnachicago

Topics: MEDICA, trade show, Düsseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, International Trade Shows, GDS, REHACARE International, Trade Show Planning, Messe Dusseldorf North America, Chicago, Compamed, CARAVAN SALON, A+A

Behind the Scenes Are the People

Posted by Robert Self on Sun, Sep 28, 2014 @ 19:22 PM

I am one of the newest members to the Messe Düsseldorf North America (MDNA) team. Actually, I am thenewest person to grace the office with my presence full time; the office is probably a little bit louder now. I’m walking into the trade show management industry with a rather fresh perspective.

I started with the MDNA team in January 2014. I haven’t even worked here a full year, and there is one thing I can say with certainty: trade show management is a team sport. We are a small office, consisting of roughly 12 employees and I have to say, it is impressive how much work this team truly takes on. What many exhibitors don’t know about us, is that we don’t only manage shows in their industry, but across multiple industries, and in multiple countries!

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Pictured (Top row, L-R):  Johanna Buehler, Justin Kesselring, Matt Spiekhout, Galina Yukhvid
(Bottom row, L-R): Sebastian Wille, Robert Self, Inga Otgon

 


Now, there’s a lot that happens “behind the scenes” of managing any project, and trade show management is no exception. In many ways, I go about my day as most people in corporate America do: I start my day with coffee and groggy “hellos” (and actually “Guten Morgens”) thrown about. When I finally embrace the willpower to check my emails, the races start. Somewhere in here I black out, and come to around 4:30 when it’s time to power down and go home.


However, when you look closer, you notice the fine tasks that require careful attention – the many cogs and wheels that somehow (due to black magic, I’m sure) come together in the very end and produce some pretty immaculate events. But it’s no witchcraft. It is the careful planning, the ideas bounced off one another, the willingness to offer help that gets these shows where they need to be.

So who are these 11 other brave souls who manage trade shows at MDNA? For many “veteran” exhibitors who’ve attended shows for countless years, we are like the distant cousins who meet back up at each family reunion in Düsseldorf, Germany. They know the routine, and therefore have long standing personal relationships with us.

I have listened as each of our project managers rattle off the names of the people they know from company A or company B, and all from memory. I have witnessed as my colleagues reunite with exhibitors and exchange hellos as old friends. I have also been asked countless times how my colleagues are doing whenever they aren’t around. So for our newer attendees and exhibitors, whether in our pavilions or in individual space, I implore you to get to know us for yourselves! We’re friendly, I promise! And we like to know you as well.

Being the newest person in the office can be daunting, but I know I have a network of helpful, friendly colleagues who don’t question extending a hand. So shake up the day and start a conversation; we may be busy, but we enjoy the interruption. It reminds us to put you first for customer service.

Contact us!
Website: www.mdna.com
Phone: (312) 781-5180
Email: [email protected]
Twitter: @mdnachicago

 

Topics: Düsseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, International Trade Shows, Trade Show Planning, Chicago, Social Networking

DIBS Redux

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Wed, Jan 8, 2014 @ 10:24 AM

Just opening the vault and dusting off an old chestnut here.  This article is a variation of one previously posted after Chicago's "Snowmageddon" of February 2011.  Enjoy!

Perhaps many of you heard this past week that Chicago had a little bit of snow. That is to say, A LOT of snow, followed by what they tell us was a "polar vortex" that sent temperatures plunging to 15F below zero at night with high temperatures in the -5F range during the daytime.  Not only did we end up with about 15-20 inches of the white stuff, we then dealt with 30+ mile per hour wind gusts, snow drifts, and a virtual collapse of commuter rail service. 
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Antonio Perez, Chicago Tribune
 

But Chicago is generally prepared and has snow removal down to a science, and now that the temperature is on the rebound for the time being, things are returning more or less to normal.

But on the side streets, it usually takes a couple of days before a snowplow will pay a visit and shove mounds of crusty packed snow up against the vehicles parked along the curb.

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Michael Tercha, Chicago Tribune
  Now anyone who lives in our fair city is familiar with the concept of “dibs”.  This tradition goes back years, and some of our grizzled old-timers say it even precedes the notorious blizzard of 1967.  Essentially, before a side street is plowed, or even afterwards, the residents shovel out their own parking spots on the street and then save them by placing whatever expendable junk they happen to have on hand in the space they have just dug out.  

That means the space now belongs to the excavator.  If you park in a saved spot, you may run some unfortunate risks that could eventually involve your car insurance company.

Hence:  DIBS.

At many of our trade shows that occur on a frequent basis, especially an annual show like MEDICA for example, an informal variation of dibs also exists.  The number of companies that return to the show from year to year is high, and there is a relatively brief registration window in which companies can submit their exhibit space applications.  Often the amount of space that is requested at MEDICA far exceeds the amount of space available at the convention center.

Returning exhibitors who submit their applications before the deadline often will get priority consideration for the same space that they had during the previous show, followed then by new-to-show exhibitors who also submitted their applications before the registration deadline.  Many times, exhibitors will request an enlargement of their space, or move to another location if possible.  But of course with 4,000+ exhibitors at MEDICA it all depends on who has returned and who is getting their space back.  Usually the best way to increase your chances of upsizing or relocating is by expressing flexibility about preferred booth dimensions, configuration, or location.

Under all circumstances, Messe Düsseldorf works diligently to try and accommodate everyone’s special requests and space requirements in a fair and equitable manner.

Registration for MEDICA is now open and runs until March 1, but it is strongly encouraged that you submit your completed registration forms well in advance of the deadline.  To request your exhibitor registration materials, simply contact us or visit the show’s website, www.medica-tradefair.com, and get your dibs on a booth at the world’s largest and leading medical industry trade fair!

Topics: MEDICA, medical, Düsseldorf, international medical trade fair, International Trade Shows, Messe Dusseldorf North America, Chicago, Booth Assignments, Floor Plans, Dibs

A Question of Perspective

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Thu, Sep 12, 2013 @ 17:34 PM

By Nina Wellbrock

Shortly after the recent Labor Day weekend was over, everybody just went back to their routine. Activities like spending time at the beach, enjoying a BBQ with friends or visiting family just flew by quickly. And now everybody is back to reality, complete with traffic jams, too many e-mails and phone calls, grabbing a quick lunch between meetings – there is always too much to do.  But let us ask a question of perspective - how much do we really think about our everyday activities such as picking up the phone, writing an e-mail or setting up a meeting compared to planning a Labor Day weekend? 
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Not much, because to us it’s just normal “procedure”. But for people who come to the international trade fair REHACARE in Dusseldorf, Germany, it does. They are looking for the newest technologies for every aspect which makes life easier for those with special needs, chronic illnesses or requiring care. Their perspective is on the little as well as on the big achievements which helps them with their daily activities and become or stay as independent as possible.

describe the image    With over 30 years of expertise and wide-ranging experience in the market, this trade fair is an ideal information platform for anyone with disabilities or chronic conditions as well as for the elderly. The quality and diversity of REHACARE are reflected in the numerous „theme parks“, information events, industry representatives, service providers.  

Over 700 national and international exhibitors will present a combination of product demonstrations and complex system solutions as well as a wide range of information in form of seminars and workshops in addition to the theme parks.

For more information about everything to see and discover at REHACARE 2013, visit http://www.rehacare.com/

Topics: Germany, Düsseldorf, International Trade Shows, REHACARE, REHACARE International, rehab trade show

Discover Your World at CARAVAN SALON 2013

Posted by Anne Meerboth-Maltz on Wed, Jul 17, 2013 @ 10:25 AM


Want To Have Some Fun
on Four Wheels?

All-wheel vehicles are becoming increasingly popular, and now is your chance to see why! At this year’s
CARAVAN SALON DÜSSELDORF 2013 - The No. 1 Show for Motor Homes and Caravans, the special “Off-Road” show will give visitors the opportunity to test drive ATV’s in the outdoor area on a specially built obstacle course.
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If you aren’t that daring, you can opt to be driven as a passenger across an adventure course.  But that wouldn’t be half the fun….

describe the image     And if that’s not enough, the “Dream Tour Cinema” show will whet your appetite for RV travel in exotic locations on four different continents: Asia (Bangladesh, Bhutan, Burma, India, Iran and Pakistan), Southeast Asia (Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Thailand, Timor and Vietnam), South America (Iguazu Falls, Andean passes, Atacama Desert), and the U.S. (“Route 66” from Chicago to Los Angeles). So much to see – so little time!
  

 

CARAVAN SALON will be held from August 31 – September 8, 2013 (trade visitor day on August 30) at the fairgrounds in Düsseldorf, Germany.  Overall, some 570 exhibitors from 25 countries will present a wide range of mobile homes and RVs as well as accessories. From small and simple RVs for two people to compact vans and campers, from family RVs and alcove motor homes to luxury motor homes – the possibilities at CARAVAN SALON are virtually unlimited.

Entrance passes can be purchased online at www.caravan-salon.com for 13 Euros (1-day ticket) or 20 Euros (2-day ticket).

Make your next vacation a real adventure - come to CARAVAN SALON and be inspired.

Oh, and enjoy the ride!

Topics: Messe Duesseldorf, Düsseldorf, International Trade Shows, RV, caravans, CARAVAN SALON, caravanning, RVs, RV trade show

Cheers! Gan Bay! Kanpai! Gun Bae!

Posted by Anne Meerboth-Maltz on Tue, Jan 29, 2013 @ 10:43 AM

Younger Asian Wine Drinkers Drive Growth in Five Key Markets

According the new “Asia – Opportunities in China and beyond” survey of the British market research institute Wine Intelligence, China will remain the most attractive Asian market for wine exporters in the next five years. But the wine industry should also take advantage of opportunities in Japan, South Korea, Singapore and even Taiwan – the other key Asian countries studied in the report.     describe the image  

The results are based on extensive qualitative and quantitative research with consumers, importers and distributors across Asia. This survey about Asian wine markets was commissioned by Messe Düsseldorf, organizer ProWein, International Trade Fair Wines and Spirits, held annually in Düsseldorf, Germany.

Although all five markets differ substantially - it would be a mistake for the wine industry to consider Asia as a single cultural entity - there are some trends and characteristics that can be observed across the continent. The new ProWein study shows that the trend towards every day, affordable imports is evident across Asia as wine gets away from its image of being purely a luxury product and becomes more attractive to younger consumers. They in particular like wine as part of their lifestyles and show a real interest in understanding it better. The on-trade is often the best way to target these consumers.

describe the image                                China’s spectacular growth is likely to continue due to improved ranges in supermarkets and more affordable pricing. Consumers are associating imported wine with sophistication and wellbeing and the number of imported wine drinkers is expected to increase well beyond the current 19 million.   

In Japan, much of the market growth is being driven by the off-trade, as consumers turn away from the on-trade for economic reasons. Wine is increasingly part of a meal for Japanese families as they embrace more Western-style eating habits. With 47 million regular wine drinkers, Japan is a relatively mature market for wine, with younger consumers regarding wine as a trendy drink and more open to “experiment” than older Japanese wine drinkers.

In South Korea too, growth is coming from younger people. The market has a huge capacity for growth: wine accounts for just 20% of drinks sales and is regarded by many Koreans as a special-occasion beverage. But the market has been growing steadily since 2000, particularly when it comes to Chilean imports and sparkling wines.

Singapore is the smallest of the five markets but the wine industry here is already buoyant, with an increasingly knowledgeable population keen to learn more about wine. Strong brand identity and high volumes are often the key to success in this geographically limited market.

Taiwan is a more problematic market for wine exports than the other Asian countries. There are more barriers facing the wine industry, including a ban on internet sales, high taxes and few English language speakers. The high price of wine and lack of female drinkers are also factors that limit opportunities in Taiwan. But again, younger consumers are showing an interest in wine and helping it to not be regarded as a prestige product.

The upcoming ProWine trade fair in Shanghai (organized by Messe Düsseldorf Shanghai and China International Exhibitions) is the ideal venue to get access to this lucrative Asian wine market. From November 13 - 15, 2013, ProWine China will offer both international and domestic producers of quality wines and spirits a platform, thereby giving Chinese retailers and importers a comprehensive overview and the opportunity for productive business contacts. A diverse supporting program consisting of tastings and seminars will complement the exhibits. With ProWine China, Messe Düsseldorf brings the successful concept of Düsseldorf ProWein to China.

Topics: Messe Düsseldorf, International Trade Shows, wine, wine and spirits, wine show, alcohol, trade fair, China, Shanghai

STEP Grants: An Important Financial Resource for U.S. Exporters

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Fri, May 4, 2012 @ 11:12 AM

In the summer of 2010, U.S. President Barack Obama announced the formation of a program known as the National Export Initiative (NEI).  A focus of this initiative was the goal of doubling U.S. exports within 5 years and to give America a stronger competitive edge in the global market.  Later that fall, he signed into law the Small Business Jobs Act of 2010 – which provided the resources to assist small businesses drive economic recovery and create jobs, striving to attain the goals set forth in the NEI.   obama signing


ABOVE: President Obama signs the Small Business Jobs Act, September 27, 2010. (Win McNamee, Getty Images.)

 

The State Trade and Export Promotion (STEP) grant initiative, launched under the Small Business Jobs Act of 2010, is a pilot grant program authorizing up to US$ 90 million in grants to the 50 U.S. states (and additional territories) over a three year period to help them increase the number of businesses that export, and to increase the value of exports by small businesses.

In 2011, the STEP program awarded 52 grants totaling US $30 million – an average grant to a U.S. state or territory was US$ 577,000.

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Administered and distributed via most U.S. state-based economic development agencies, these funds are designated for authorized activities that including foreign trade missions, design of international marketing products, and of course:  OVERSEAS TRADE SHOWS SUCH AS THOSE ORGANIZED AND PRODUCED WORLDWIDE BY MESSE DUESSELDORF!

 
Each state has its own project plans and STEP grant dispersal procedures, so be sure to contact your state’s economic development agency for details (a full list can be found HERE).

Don’t delay:  There's money on the table.

Topics: Exports, International Trade Shows, President Barack Obama, National Export Initiative, STEP, Step Grant, SBA

REFOCUS ON BRAZIL: TRADESHOW SHIPPING AND CUSTOMS

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Fri, Apr 13, 2012 @ 11:38 AM

...or Howta SendYerStuff to Brazil


HOSPITALAR 2012 is just around the corner, and everything is shaping up for another exciting and more successful trade show than ever.  The largest medical industry event of South America is on track to feature over 1,250 exhibitors and is expected to draw over 85,000 trade visitors.

Clearly exciting things are happening in the Brazilian healthcare market, and US exporters are taking notice!

                               

 

 Hospitalar 007 450                                                          

At this year’s show alone, the number of US-based direct exhibitors has increased by 36% compared to last year, and in fact the North American Pavilion – produced and organized by Messe Duesseldorf North America – is 56% larger than in 2011. 

But despite these impressive results, many companies from overseas who participate at this, or any trade shows in Brazil, get caught in a Brazilian shipping and customs quagmire that can turn a company’s best laid trade show plans upside down.

Hence: A few words about Howta SendYerStuff to Brazil.

describe the image   Brazilian customs clearance procedures for incoming and outgoing freight shipments for trade shows within Brazil are very detailed and time-consuming, and the authorities are rigid and exceptionally rigorous in the enforcement of the prevailing Brazilian customs regulations.

Standard Brazilian cargo handling, transfer, and storage charges, along with compulsory Brazilian customs bonding fees, taxes, and other sometimes unforeseen cargo handling expenses often may be viewed as high by overseas exhibitors.  In some cases, the cost of shipping alone can far exceed the cost of the exhibit space itself!
 

Standard Brazilian cargo handling, transfer, and storage charges, along with compulsory Brazilian customs bonding fees, taxes, and other sometimes unforeseen cargo handling expenses often may be viewed as high by overseas exhibitors.  In some cases, the cost of shipping alone can far exceed the cost of the exhibit space itself!

To ensure that each international exhibitor’s requirements are handled expertly and as smoothly as possible, Brazilian show management companies appoint a locally-based customs broker to handle ALL in-coming and out-going shipments to and from their trade fairs.

Far in advance of the trade show, at least three months or more, it is highly recommend that the overseas exhibitor start working with its locally-based freight forwarder of choice to review its shipping options, paperwork requirements, and of course to secure cost estimates.  It is particularly important to select a freight forwarder that has experience in shipping to Brazil, or better yet a freight forwarder that specializes specifically in international trade show shipping.

Simply selecting an international freight forwarder based upon the lowest price quotation, or attempting to send show materials with an international courier service in order to save a few dollars can be risky and result in a shipment not arriving at the booth in time for the show!

Furthermore, all export documentation must meet exact requirements, and all shipments must be pre-authorized by Brazilian customs authorities before they can be shipped out of the United States to Brazil.  Items for temporary import and items that will be given away and/or consumed during the exhibition must be packed and precisely documented separately, and sent in separate crates.

Messe Duesseldorf North America has been the official marketing and sales office for HOSPITALAR for more than a decade and can coach U.S. companies in all aspects of their trade fair planning for this important event!


Topics: exhibiting, medical trade show, medical trade fair, International Trade Shows, Brazil, Hospitalar, Trade Show Planning, Shipping

The Top Ten of 2011

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Wed, Dec 7, 2011 @ 11:42 AM

describe the image        Well, here we are – December already.  I don’t know about you, but the past year has disappeared faster than anticipated.  And I haven’t done any Christmas shopping yet.  I think a heretofore snowless Chicago has made it feel like an extended autumn…at least that’s what that bowl of still uneaten Halloween candy sitting on top of the refrigerator makes me think.

Overall, it was a busy year for us at Messe Duesseldorf.  Several of our industry-leading events were held in Germany this year:  boot Düsseldorf, EuroShop, interpack, GIFA-METEC-THERMPROCESS-NEWCAST, MEDICA, COMPAMED … and drupa and wire / Tube are just around the corner in 2012.

These events of the past year have made me reflect about a combination of commonly asked questions and exhibitor pitfalls I’ve observed.  I’ve boiled them down to the Top 10 - hopefully without offense to David Letterman and Worldwide Pants!

Cue the drum roll...
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                                   Sorry Dave!

# 10     European electricity is supplied at 220/230 V.  In the U.S. we operate at 110/120 V.  So if you plug in your own stuff without a step-down transformer, don’t be surprised if it reacts like a sparkler on the Fourth of July.

# 9       Entrance passes / name badges for our shows in Germany are not linked to a lead retrieval system, at least not yet anyway.  They’re used primarily for entry to the fairgrounds, secondly as a means of identification, and thirdly…

# 8       Entrance passes / name badges are also tickets to ride the public transportation network.  Some shows’ tickets are only valid within the city of Duesseldorf (VRR), other shows are valid beyond the city’s borders (VRS).  But make sure in advance that you know which zones are covered for your specific show in order to avoid an awkward very public discussion with a German conductor in front of a train car full people.

# 7       Yes, there’s wireless internet access at the fairgrounds, and we have a highly-rated official supplier.  However I’ve learned anecdotally that there are other reputable German wireless companies who provide competitive service (and sometimes temporary trial offers) that can be booked online. I’m just sayin’, that’s all.

# 6       Europeans don’t do “Pop-Up” display stands like we do at shows in the U.S.  If you plan to ship your Pop-Up to the show, you should still plan to order a modular system stand package (walls, carpet, electricity, basic furnishings) and then assemble the pop-up within the booth.  Remember, system stands in Germany are customary – without one you’ll probably stand out for the wrong reasons.

# 5       Bring ALL of your documentation and order confirmations with you to the show!  Nothing says wild goose chase more than not knowing which service provider is building your booth, supplying your booth furnishings, or which freight forwarding company was used to send your freight to Duesseldorf.

# 4 
      Make sure your bills are paid in full before you head over to Germany and avoid the walk of shame to the cashier counter in the service center because your electricity hasn’t been turned on.  Messe Düsseldorf North America is here to assist you in deciphering your invoices and to make sure that nothing falls thru the cracks.  And don’t be alarmed, we’ll be happy to remind you in good time before the show starts of any open balances!

# 3       Listings in the show’s catalogue are not necessarily free.  Unlike trade shows in the U.S., most of our events in Germany allow you to only have an alphabetical listing in the show catalogue and single index listing at the back of the directory.  Anything else you usually have to pay for – that’s just how the catalogue’s publisher rolls.

# 2       Social media has come into increased prominence especially within the past year.  Acquaint yourself with the available technologies – and know the show’s Twitter handle.  Promote your company before, during, and after the show.  Take advantage in advance of the promotional exhibitor materials.   Face it – this is the way things are going and just sitting in your booth hoping everyone will just come to visit is probably not going to cut the mustard, unless Jennifer Aniston is sitting there with you for some reason.          describe the image
Gratuitous picture of TV & Film Star, Jennifer Aniston.

#1
       Pay attention to deadlines!  We know that all this registration and ordering is essentially an administrative task, easily pushed to the back burner. But missing a deadline can mean the difference between getting or not getting a booth in a show, or having to pay a surcharge for a booth order.

Sometimes things at trade shows can go awry for any number of reasons, but always keep in mind that our number one priority is to make sure that you get the assistance that you need as quickly and efficiently as possible, and to make sure that the pieces are put in place so that you have the best trade show possible!  Remember, we’re here to help!

Enjoy the holidays!

Topics: MEDICA, Messe Duesseldorf, exhibiting, International Trade Shows, Exhibitor Badges, Compamed, interpack, Social Media, exhibit booth, drupa, Top 10

ἀνάγκᾳ δ’ οὐδὲ θεοὶ μάχονται

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Fri, Nov 4, 2011 @ 09:28 AM

Anánkāi d'oudè theoì mákhontai
   - Not even the gods fight necessity.

Simonides of Ceos
Greek lyric poet (c. 556 BC-468 BC)

describe the image     

Weeeee, it’s sure been a heckofa week!  Just a week ago the stock markets soared after the EU seemingly averted a looming debt crisis.

Here in the US, the media was gushing about “Rocktober” – the best gains on Wall Street during the month of October since sometime in the early 1970s.  Even yours truly thought it noteworthy enough to throw up a clever and witty yet informative blog post about it.

 

Then earlier this week it appeared that the whole shebang was on the verge of unraveling:

  • For some reason, the Greek prime minister unexpectedly announced he was going to put the agreement to a national popular vote referendum.  Chances of passage: ZERO.
  • Stunned EU Leaders, notably those of Germany and France, issued withering responses and threatened to withhold further bailout funding for the cash-strapped country.
  • Stock markets plunged worldwide.  Buh-bye Rocktober.
  • The G20 Economic Summit convened in Cannes, France, coincidentally - whereby everyone could read the Riot Act to the Greek Prime Minister in person.
  • Greek Prime Minister cancels referendum Thursday, now facing a parliamentary confidence vote Friday.

The ancient Greek poet Simonides wrote, "Anánkāi d'oudè theoì mákhontai" ("Not even the gods fight necessity").  Seems the Prime Minister of Greece was unfamiliar with the sentiment.

I've also been wondering all week what the Greek version of Windex is.

Topics: international business, Düsseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, International Trade, International Trade Shows, Greece, Economic Crisis, Euro