Messe Düsseldorf North America - Trade Show Daily

The Top Ten of 2011

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Wed, Dec 7, 2011 @ 11:42 AM

describe the image        Well, here we are – December already.  I don’t know about you, but the past year has disappeared faster than anticipated.  And I haven’t done any Christmas shopping yet.  I think a heretofore snowless Chicago has made it feel like an extended autumn…at least that’s what that bowl of still uneaten Halloween candy sitting on top of the refrigerator makes me think.

Overall, it was a busy year for us at Messe Duesseldorf.  Several of our industry-leading events were held in Germany this year:  boot Düsseldorf, EuroShop, interpack, GIFA-METEC-THERMPROCESS-NEWCAST, MEDICA, COMPAMED … and drupa and wire / Tube are just around the corner in 2012.

These events of the past year have made me reflect about a combination of commonly asked questions and exhibitor pitfalls I’ve observed.  I’ve boiled them down to the Top 10 - hopefully without offense to David Letterman and Worldwide Pants!

Cue the drum roll...
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                                   Sorry Dave!

# 10     European electricity is supplied at 220/230 V.  In the U.S. we operate at 110/120 V.  So if you plug in your own stuff without a step-down transformer, don’t be surprised if it reacts like a sparkler on the Fourth of July.

# 9       Entrance passes / name badges for our shows in Germany are not linked to a lead retrieval system, at least not yet anyway.  They’re used primarily for entry to the fairgrounds, secondly as a means of identification, and thirdly…

# 8       Entrance passes / name badges are also tickets to ride the public transportation network.  Some shows’ tickets are only valid within the city of Duesseldorf (VRR), other shows are valid beyond the city’s borders (VRS).  But make sure in advance that you know which zones are covered for your specific show in order to avoid an awkward very public discussion with a German conductor in front of a train car full people.

# 7       Yes, there’s wireless internet access at the fairgrounds, and we have a highly-rated official supplier.  However I’ve learned anecdotally that there are other reputable German wireless companies who provide competitive service (and sometimes temporary trial offers) that can be booked online. I’m just sayin’, that’s all.

# 6       Europeans don’t do “Pop-Up” display stands like we do at shows in the U.S.  If you plan to ship your Pop-Up to the show, you should still plan to order a modular system stand package (walls, carpet, electricity, basic furnishings) and then assemble the pop-up within the booth.  Remember, system stands in Germany are customary – without one you’ll probably stand out for the wrong reasons.

# 5       Bring ALL of your documentation and order confirmations with you to the show!  Nothing says wild goose chase more than not knowing which service provider is building your booth, supplying your booth furnishings, or which freight forwarding company was used to send your freight to Duesseldorf.

# 4 
      Make sure your bills are paid in full before you head over to Germany and avoid the walk of shame to the cashier counter in the service center because your electricity hasn’t been turned on.  Messe Düsseldorf North America is here to assist you in deciphering your invoices and to make sure that nothing falls thru the cracks.  And don’t be alarmed, we’ll be happy to remind you in good time before the show starts of any open balances!

# 3       Listings in the show’s catalogue are not necessarily free.  Unlike trade shows in the U.S., most of our events in Germany allow you to only have an alphabetical listing in the show catalogue and single index listing at the back of the directory.  Anything else you usually have to pay for – that’s just how the catalogue’s publisher rolls.

# 2       Social media has come into increased prominence especially within the past year.  Acquaint yourself with the available technologies – and know the show’s Twitter handle.  Promote your company before, during, and after the show.  Take advantage in advance of the promotional exhibitor materials.   Face it – this is the way things are going and just sitting in your booth hoping everyone will just come to visit is probably not going to cut the mustard, unless Jennifer Aniston is sitting there with you for some reason.          describe the image
Gratuitous picture of TV & Film Star, Jennifer Aniston.

#1
       Pay attention to deadlines!  We know that all this registration and ordering is essentially an administrative task, easily pushed to the back burner. But missing a deadline can mean the difference between getting or not getting a booth in a show, or having to pay a surcharge for a booth order.

Sometimes things at trade shows can go awry for any number of reasons, but always keep in mind that our number one priority is to make sure that you get the assistance that you need as quickly and efficiently as possible, and to make sure that the pieces are put in place so that you have the best trade show possible!  Remember, we’re here to help!

Enjoy the holidays!

Topics: MEDICA, Messe Duesseldorf, exhibiting, International Trade Shows, Exhibitor Badges, Compamed, interpack, Social Media, exhibit booth, drupa, Top 10

A Summer of Discontent? Not so Fast...

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Fri, Aug 12, 2011 @ 10:45 AM

Watching this summer’s nonstop political childish behavior wrangling and economic rollercoaster uncertainty unfold on both sides of the Atlantic would make a reasonable person think that the whole world’s unraveling at the seams.  With 24 hour cable-TV talking heads feeding us their nonstop personal opinions and endless electronic push notifications cranking out of our smart-phones feeding us every trivial byte of “news”, you’d think that modern civilization is on the verge of collapse.    covereyes  
I Just Can't Take it Anymore!  

Hardly.  Put it all aside, calm yourself, and take three deep breaths.  Better now?

Over the past months something remarkable has been occurring beneath the radar of the much-hyped nonsense that passes for news and politics nowadays.

 
2011 has stacked up as a remarkably positive year for U.S. companies seeking export markets and participating at Messe Duesseldorf’s trade shows.

Not withstanding the very positive results for US companies that have already participated at this year’s leading interpack and GIFA-METEC-THERMPROCESS-NEWCAST events in Germany, and Hospitalar in Brazil, record-breaking participation at the upcoming MEDICA and COMPAMED trade fairs in Düsseldorf this November will be realized.

MEDICA and COMPAMED will feature nearly 450 U.S.-based exhibitors occupying nearly 65,000 square feet of net exhibit space, more space back to back and side to side than would fill an entire US-football field!  Add in the participating companies from Canada and from Mexico at MEDICA and COMPAMED, and the show is the largest contingent of North-American based exhibitors at a medical industry event fair anywhere outside of the western hemisphere!

And just around the corner next spring:  the once-every-four-year drupa 2012 print-media trade will return to Düsseldorf for a whopping two-week stint, and where American companies will occupy about 2 football fields of space.

True, we’ve been saddled here with a sluggish economy and not enough jobs, but exports have proven to be an important way to grow business, put people to work, and stay competitive with growing international competition!  So instead of wringing our hands about cable’s predicted societal implosion, just turn off the television and reset your browser’s homepage to www.mdna.com in order to focus on the the positive, exciting things that U.S. innovators and exporters are proudly doing!


Topics: MEDICA, Exports, International Trade, International Trade Shows, Compamed, interpack, drupa

Duesseldorf Packing It In on the World Stage

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Fri, May 20, 2011 @ 14:57 PM

The past week in Duesseldorf, Germany was – to put it lightly – momentous.

The city put itself front and center on the international stage in more ways that one, and admirably once again demonstrated that it is comfortable player among the first-tier of world-class cities.
eurovision1 In the span of a week, Duesseldorf hosted not only the world’s largest and leading international packaging trade show, interpack, it also simultaneously hosted the renowned Eurovision Song Contest at the Esprit Arena, adjacent to the Duesseldorf fairgrounds.

For those of you who aren’t familiar with the Eurovision Song Contest, this event is perhaps one of the most watched annual TV spectacles in Europe.  Each European country submits a single band or singer performing a single song in a viewer / voter elimination contest, and then on the final night after the field has been narrowed to just 25 countries – the whole of Europe votes for their favorite by text-message voting.

The air was electrified on Saturday evening, May 14.  The city of Duesseldorf turned into one giant block party as thousands converged to the old city and the banks of the Rhine River to watch live coverage on outdoor large screens of the events inside the Arena.  Restaurants, bars and nightclubs were packed to overflowing and the narrow streets outside were full as everyone watched and waited to find out this year’s winner, Azerbaijan (Europe!?) for its contestants’ (Ell/Nikk) entry Running Scared.

At right:  Nikki Jamal and Eldar Kasimov of Ell/Nikki representing Azerbaijan celebrate on Saturday, May 14, 2011 with the Eurovision trophy and their national flag after winning the Grand Final of the 56th Eurovision Song Contest.  © AFP/GETTY IMAGES

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On the dual track, interpack returned to the Duesseldorf fairgrounds also to rave reviews and a palpable perception that the industry is once again on the uptick.  Featuring over 2,700 exhibitors from 60 countries, the show attracted a total of 166,000 trade visitors – 60 percent from outside of Germany.  Particularly striking was the further significant increase in the proportion of decision-makers attending the show over the previous staging in 2008.  Almost three quarters of trade visitors reported they came from management with decision making authority – a remarkable figure!

At the same time SAVE FOOD International Congress was held, highlighting the ongoing conflict between nutrition, packaging and sustainability.  In collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), this meeting attracted some 300 participants and dignitaries who discussed the magnitude and causes of global food waste and explored the contribution that improved packaging could make in the fight against food waste.

And Duesseldorf handled all these important international events with flair.  For a week under sunny skies the city became the international stage for business and culture, a remarkable feat that many other aspiring cities undoubtedly envy and aspire to.

Congratulations Duesseldorf!

Topics: Messe Duesseldorf, Düsseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, International Trade Shows, City of Düsseldorf, packaging, interpack, visit Dusseldorf, Dusseldorf bars, Dusseldorf pubs, Dusseldorf nightlife, Duesseldorf nightlife, Dusseldorf nightclubs, Duesseldorf bars, Duesseldorf nightclubs, Dusseldorf entertainment, Duesseldorf entertainment, SAVE FOOD, Eurovision, Song Contest, Anuga Foodtec, PMMI, Pack Expo

SAVE FOOD – For a World Aware of its Resources

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Fri, Jan 28, 2011 @ 11:59 AM

There’s an episode from the long-running FOX televsion comedy series The Simpsons™ in which the family is sitting on the couch watching the news, when a teaser for an upcoming segment appears:

...coming up next, a new fad that's sweeping the nation - wasting food!

The accompanying image is that of a smiling man dumping an entire roasted turkey on a platter into a garbage can, then pouring an entire bottle of fresh milk on top of it. (© FOX / The Simpsons™, Episode 9F02, Lisa The Beauty Queen.)

wasting food  

To be sure it’s a humorous and satirical critique on America’s over-abundance, hyper-consumption, perceived collective laziness, and easy access to everything.  But in actuality millions around the world face a completely different reality about access to food, and especially the ability to safely and efficiently store it.

From May 16 – 17, 2011, Messe Düsseldorf, in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), will welcome the premiere of the SAVE FOOD International Congress.  At the center of this meeting, the conflict between nutrition, packaging and sustainability will be addressed.  SAVE FOOD 2011 will illuminate the magnitude and causes of global food waste and underscore the contribution that improved packaging could make in the fight against food waste.

The congress will be held parallel to interpack 2011, the world’s largest and leading international trade fair for the packaging and related processing industries.  It will bring together the most important stakeholders from the food and packaging industries, retail, government, administration, research and the public.

The FAO will present three new studies and surveys of wealthy, developing and emerging nations.  Two of the planned studies will depict the problem of food waste along the worldwide supply chain (loss of nutritional value, deterioration of nutritional quality, insufficient food safety, magnitude of losses), and the third study will focus on concrete perspectives of the packaging industry business model against this background.

For additional information about this unique and important program, click below!

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Topics: Announcements, Messe Duesseldorf, Düsseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, International Trade Shows, packaging, interpack, SAVE FOOD, food packaging, FAO, United Nations

New Generation of Packagings: No Chance for Pharmaceutical Counterfeiting

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Mon, Dec 20, 2010 @ 16:06 PM

describe the image Counterfeiting of medication is rapidly increasing. In Germany, one in twenty medications has been tainted. Researchers are therefore developing authenticity seals and security codes intended to make drug packagings uniquely identifiable.
Anyone who buys Sinupret sinusitis pills from pharmaceuticals producer Bionorica will now see on the folding carton a three-dimensional, optically variable, embossed mark, which can be seen in relief when the carton is tilted. Since the herbal medication was so often copied, Bionorica engaged the Munich company Giesecke & Devrient, which specializes in printing bank notes, to design this tangible security feature for Sinupret. Artur Theis, a subsidiary of the Edelmann Group, developed the production process for the new packaging. The mark is printed and embossed by Braun Pharmadruck, also an Edelmann subsidiary. Sinupret, one of the most popular products on the cold treatment market, is just the start: by the end of 2011, Bionorica intends to emboss the packagings of all its product ranges with the new quality seal. “We want to provide the best possible safeguards for pharmacies and users”, says company head Michael Popp.

Producers who have problems with counterfeiters must make their products uniquely identifiable. This is especially true in the pharmaceutical sector. “The danger of counterfeit medication is growing”, states Ulrike Holzgrabe of the German Pharmaceutical Society (DphG). Although producers of pharmaceuticals experience losses amounting to billions of Euros each year through product piracy, this is not the main problem, since counterfeit medications threaten the health or even the lives of unsuspecting patients.

The Internet is a weak spot

According to EU figures, the German customs authorities seized counterfeit medications worth 11.5 million Euros in 2009 – 30% more than in the previous year. In addition, a World Health Organisation (WHO) study claims that even in supposedly safe regions such as Europe and the U.S., up to 10% of all medications are counterfeit. According to Ulrike Holzgrabe, the proportion of such counterfeit products in Germany is about 5%. “But this is just the tip of the iceberg”, she suspects. Mail order business offers criminals the greatest opportunities. This sector is booming, especially in Germany. Marketing research firm ACNielsen estimates that sales of non-prescription drugs increased by a quarter last year. According to the consumer research consultancy company GfK, one in four Germans now obtain medications by mail order. At the same time, it is apparently becoming harder for consumers to distinguish between reputable mail order pharmacies and illegal traders. Test purchases by the Central Laboratory of German Pharmacists confirm counterfeiting rates of 50% for medications sold by illegal Internet pharmacies, for example.

“Producers of pharmaceuticals are therefore more willing to look for methods to provide better security against counterfeiting”, remarks Ulrike Holzgrabe. The companies have two aims: firstly, consumers should be able to verify that they have received an original product; and secondly, experts should be able to identify counterfeits when they do inspections. The most active companies include not only medicinal plant specialist Bionorica but also Bayer Healthcare, whose products are among the most frequently counterfeited worldwide. The company therefore explains on its website www.vorsicht-faelschung.de how patients can distinguish between original Bayer preparations and imitations. In the future, Bayer Healthcare will also provide its medications packagings with counterfeit-proof features. The Leverkusen-based company has also engaged Artur Theis for this project. “Our task is to make the security features suitable for a folding carton production line, and then for series production”, explains Ulrich Doerstelmann, head of the counterfeiting security department at the Edelmann subsidiary.

Based on banknote printing

In Germany, Artur Theis is regarded as the specialist for uncopyable folding cartons. The conditions in its Wuppertal plant, which has been converted into a complete counterfeiting security facility, are the same as those in a banknote printing company: there is strict access control to the production section, the security zones are off-limits for most of the personnel and all processes are exactly documented and archived. The degree of meticulousness is so far unique in the German packaging industry. The result of the cooperation with Bayer Healthcare is a sort of lenticular image that cannot be imitated by counterfeiters. “We combine printing and embossing technology and use UV security inks,” commented Ulrich Doerstelmann.

The EU, however, requires yet another step to be taken by the pharmaceuticals industry to ensure greater patient safety. Industry Commissioner Günter Verheugen announced that in 2011 there will be a standard procedure at EU level in the fight against the counterfeiting of medications. In 2008, the Commission proposed that medication packagings should be protected by a security mark and that in that future it should be possible to retrace their path from the counter back to the factory. The WHO is also a strong supporter of counterfeit-proof labelling. Producers of pharmaceuticals are therefore pushing for the introduction of an electronic proof of origin in form of a track and trace system, with which the complete supply chain can be monitored.

In order to test and demonstrate coding and identification solutions, the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA) launched a pilot project in Sweden in September 2009. For several weeks, medication packagings for 25 pharmacies in the Stockholm region were provided with a two-dimensional data matrix code. This can hold more information than a simple bar code. In the Swedish project, it contained an article number, a batch number, a use-by date and a serial number. At the pharmacy, the code was scanned and compared immediately with an entry in a database. The whole process took only a few seconds, so that counterfeits were immediately identified. Only after this security check did the customer receive the medication. About 100,000 medicacation packagings were tested using this system – with great success, as the EFPIA reported.

Origin checks by scanner

Experts therefore confidently expect the track and trace system to be implemented throughout Europe in the near future. “The EU’s pharmaceuticals package could become law in 2010”, notes Ulrich Dörstelmann. Manufacturers of machinery and systems are well prepared for a switchover. For example, Optima Group Pharma, which specializes in filling and sealing syringes and vials already offers, on request, coordinated track and trace solutions for producers of pharmaceuticals. “Ready-to-use syringes are stored and transported in special syringe nests in plastic boxes referred to as tubs. Our machines label the containers, so that they can be traced at any time”, explains company spokesman Henning Felix. Bosch Packaging Technology, which supplies filling, processing and packaging technology for the pharmaceuticals industry, also has printing and tracing equipment in its portfolio. Bosch product manager Daniel Sanwald explains the function of the printing module as follows: Each minute, up to 400 folding cartons are transported on a conveyor belt at high-speed through a printer, which labels each carton with a data matrix code containing a production number, use-by date and serial number. A camera subsequently checks and verifies the code. The data are finally stored on a high-capacity central server, from which they can always be called up. If a product that cannot be identified in this way turns up in a pharmacy, it must be a counterfeit. “If track and trace becomes mandatory, thousands of production lines will have to be retooled. We can see enormous market potential for our technology”, says Daniel Sanwald. At interpack 2011, the leading international trade fair for the packaging industry, manufacturers of machinery and systems will present their track and trace solutions from May 12 - 18, 2011 in Düsseldorf, Germany.

A security offensive by producers of pharmaceuticals would also increase demand for high quality packaging materials producers. In order to cut costs during the economic crisis, many companies bought packagings and packaging components for their medications in China. The disadvantage is that these products are often of poorer quality, so that dosage sprays, catheters or pumps, for example, may not function correctly or may break more easily. “All those who subscribe to patient safety and who want to send a clear signal that quality is a top priority, will no longer use these products in the future”, says Peter Roesch, head of sales at atomiser pump manufacturer Aero Pump. He can see a large market for his company’s quality products: “We put a high priority on dimensional accuracy and precision, and we invest heavily in quality assurance and innovation. Aero Pump will also present its innovations at interpack 2011.

It is unlikely that pharmaceutical counterfeiters will be attracted by medications that have been provided with a security mark, a code and top quality packaging. However, there are still many obstacles on the path to obtaining maximum patent protection. An enormous investment is required in order to retool packaging lines and this could prevent pharmaceutical companies from acting quickly. Even if the EU rapidly approves its pharmaceutical packages, the implementation process could take years. Another aspect that has yet to be clarified is where all the data associated with a pan-European track and trace system should be stored. Will there be several geographically dispersed servers or one central system? “And then someone must be the owner. This raises the question of who trusts who?” remarks Bosch manager Daniel Sanwald.

Topics: trade show, international business, Düsseldorf, International Trade, International Trade Shows, trade fair, Product Information, packaging, interpack

FPSA and Messe Duesseldorf Form Strategic Alliance

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Wed, Dec 1, 2010 @ 15:22 PM

McLean, Virginia based FPSA (The Food Processing Suppliers Association) is a global trade association serving suppliers in the food and beverage industries. The Association's programs and services support its members by providing assistance in marketing their products and services, overall improvement in key business practices and many opportunities to network among industry colleagues.  Among the association's programs and services to achieve these objectives is PROCESS EXPO, The Global Food Equipment and Technology Show.

Messe Düsseldorf GmbH and The FPSA recently announced the formation of a formal strategic alliance to increase the international reach of PROCESS EXPO as part of interpack’s worldwide product family.

Messe Duesseldorf will aid in the sale of booth space at PROCESS EXPO as well as well as promoting visitor attendance to food processors around the globe.

FPSA and MD shake hands

Pictured from left to right:  Bernd Jablonowski (Project Director, interpack 2011), Hans Werner Reinhard (Executive Vice President, Messe Duesseldorf GmbH), Jan Erik Kuhlmann (President & CEO, Multivac), David Seckman (President & CEO, FPSA).

The renowned interpack trade fair, organized by Messe Duesseldorf, was founded in 1958 and developed over the decades into the number one global platform for the packaging and processing industry.  The last staging of the show in 2008 featured 2,744 exhibitors from 60 nations and attracted 179,000 trade visitors.

“This partnership will significantly increase the presence of PROCESS EXPO in the international market, where Messe Duesseldorf is a leader within the processing and packaging trade show arena,” stated Scott Scriven, Chairman of FPSA. “With 7 international subsidiaries and 68 foreign representatives worldwide supporting Messe Duesseldorf in 127 countries, PROCESS EXPO will have unprecedented access to new markets,” he added.

 “Messe Duessseldorf is pleased to be joining with FPSA in the formation of this partnership. The exponential growth of PROCESS EXPO since the announcement of the move to a biennial show tells us that strategically, this is where we need to be in the North American market. We are now pleased to offer our existing customers a new platform,” added Hans Werner Reinhard, Executive Vice President of Messe Duesseldorf.

PROCESS EXPO will be held November 1-4, 2011 at the McCormick Place Convention Center in Chicago, Illinois.  www.myprocessexpo.com

interpack will return to the fairgrounds in Duesseldorf, Germany May 12-18, 2011.  www.interpack.com

Topics: Announcements, Germany, trade show, Messe, international, Messe Duesseldorf, international business, Düsseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, Exports, International Trade, International Trade Shows, trade fair, trade show organizer, Chicago, packaging, interpack, show, FPSA, Food Processing Suppliers Association, food packaging