Messe Düsseldorf North America - Trade Show Daily

Slapped with Snow & Piles of Paper!

Posted by Robert Self on Fri, Feb 20, 2015 @ 11:30 AM

Winter is hard. Few can argue against that. It’s cold. The sun barely shines. Shoveling starts. Delays commence. And cabin fever sets. But despite the numb fingers and all, we would like to give you hope and remind you that brighter days are ahead!

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(Photo: Typical Chicago Winter - 2015)

Now, I don’t know about you, but when winter comes around I just tend to move slower – and we see the same mentality occur in the trade show industry. Sure, the main seasons for trade shows to occur are in early Spring and early Winter, but much planning for these shows occurs… well… now.

There are forms to fill out, documents to sign, invoices to pay, and more! We can’t allow our desire to remain sluggish take over! But when all you want to do is hibernate, how can you possibly keep up the momentum to plan for a show? Simply put, it’s the dedication that goes into a project that allows momentum to forge onward. Let me give you an example:

Two weeks ago our Chicago office was basically slapped by Mother Nature, who thought it funny to dump 19.6 inches of snow on the city - making for our fifth largest blizzard in Chicago’s recorded history.

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(Photo: There's an actual car under there)

But, being the thick-skinned, snow-savvy people we are as Chicagoans, we still trekked out in cold using our streets and the ‘L’ (our public transit system) to get around, as no travel bans were placed. I, for one, was one of those crazies – just out for a casual stroll to my Super Bowl Sunday gathering. NOTHING was going to keep me from the food, friends, football game, food, commercials, food, Katy Perry half-time show, food, and food. And for most Chicagoans alike, it was business as usual. (Granted there were a few… casualties. See: photo of abandoned car).

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(Photo: Abandoned cars remain in middle of Chicago streets
from previous night, blocking plows & tow trucks)

While many Chicago offices, including ours, placed our safety before work and allowed us to remain home considering the danger element, there were still people crowding the streets on Monday morning. Our office in particular saw an amazing turnout. Because we know our shows are time-sensitive projects, and we want to make sure we’re on top of our game. That desire to meet deadlines and to plan ahead for any road bumps we may cross brought us through the tundra and to our computer screens. For you, our exhibitors & visitors.

Here’s another: Currently, our building is experiencing some electrical issues unrelated to our particular office, which has made the heat go out. It is currently -15 degrees Fahrenheit outside our windows, while the west coast parodies what hardship feels like. Once again offered the safety to stay home until the issue is fixed, what did we do? We put on another layer, sucked it up, and came anyway.

You see, problems can come at you from all angles without you ever being able to see it coming (much like weather). But rolling with the punches, remaining optimistic, and most importantly planning ahead allows you to find the solutions. In this particular case the solution just happens to be an extra pair of long underwear.

Basically, any show that we organize for the early Winter season (i.e. September-December) undergoes heavy organizing during this, the dreaded dead depths of the late Winter season (i.e. January-March). But we’re here to send you reminders, give you calls, and motivate you. Many deadlines may be approaching for shows in your industry. So while winter is hard, the sun is rising earlier/setting later. The snow and ice are thawing (at least right before it freezes again). And the first day of Spring is next month! Besides, the groundhog reared his head nearly three weeks ago – so we’re half way out of the woods! So here’s to early planning! And if you ever have questions or doubts, you can always reach out to us! Our contact information is below!

Contact us!
Website: www.mdna.com
Phone: (312) 781-5180
Email: info@mdna.com
Twitter: @mdnachicago

Topics: MEDICA, trade show, Düsseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, International Trade Shows, GDS, REHACARE International, Trade Show Planning, Messe Dusseldorf North America, Chicago, Compamed, CARAVAN SALON, A+A

Sao Paulo, Brazil: Redefined

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Fri, Apr 12, 2013 @ 15:43 PM

A few weeks ago there was an absorbing article by New York Times travel columnist Simon Romero, raving about the urban gentrification of Brazil’s largest city, São Paulo.

He pointed out in years past that this metropolis of 20 million was intimidating, some areas decaying, and an aura of pervasive poverty and crime. But in the past 10 years, this city named after Saint Paul has undergone an amazing transformation. With the country’s ongoing unparalleled economic expansion, the rapidly expanding middle class has rediscovered the city as a place for living, work, and recreation.   describe the image  

Noticeably, waves of immigrants from elsewhere in the Americas, and from as far away as Europe, Africa, and Asia are making their way in as well to carve their niche into Paulistan society, bringing with them rich heritage and new vigor every society needs to grow and move forward.

This is the perfect metaphor for what has been occurring within the medical industry in Brazil as well. As more and more Brazilians have prospered, the demand for ever better medical care has logically increased as well. Brazil’s market for medical technology grew by almost 18% in 2011 and has achieved a volume of US$ 7.6 billion. In 2011, the importation value of medical equipment and products from abroad was placed at US$ 3.03 billion, over 40% of total consumption!

Hospitalar 2013, International Fair of Products, Equipment, Services and Technology for Hospitals, Laboratories, Pharmacies, Health Clinics and Medical Offices has now for 20 years been the country’s leading international medical trade fair, serving as the perfect platform for overseas companies to enter this thriving and growing market. From the US and Canada alone nearly 60 companies will be on hand presenting their latest technologies and products – of which over a third will participate in the North American Pavilion, organized and produced by Messe Düsseldorf North America.

Annually, Hospitalar has featured around 1,300 exhibitors and enjoyed over 90,000 trade visits – making it not only Latin America’s largest and leading medical industry trade show, but one of the largest in the world.

So why not check out São Paulo and see for yourself all of the exciting developments, not just within the medical sector, but the vibrancy of the city.

And just a tip: If you go there and want one of the most fantastic dining experiences ever, visit Mocoto Restaurante & Cachaçaria. The young chef there, Rodrigo Oliveira, is pushing the envelope of Brazilian cuisine and raising it to new and exciting levels, much like everywhere in Brazil these days.

Topics: medical, medical equipment, trade show, international medical trade fair, North American Pavilion, Brazil, Sao Paulo, Hospitalar, Messe Dusseldorf North America

Singapore: Southeast Asia’s Hot Medical Device Market

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Tue, Jun 26, 2012 @ 16:04 PM

I’ve been lucky to visit the Southeast Asian island-nation of Singapore a couple of times, and came home impressed by the friendliness of its citizens, the orderliness of its society, the gleaming sky scrapers, and its forward thinking approach to business.

However, as a born and raised Chicagoan, I couldn’t get over just how hot I felt there the entire time.  Perched near the equator, temperatures hover around the low 90s the entire year, equally during the daytime and night, and the humidity – oh, the humanity humidity!

To combat the incessant heat, I came to appreciate a refreshing local libation, known the world over as the Singapore Sling – a dandy cocktail created about a hundred years ago by an ingenious fellow named Ngiam Tong Boon, working at the Long Bar of the renowned Raffles Hotel.  If you find yourself in town, I’d highly recommend it.
       the famous Singapore Sling
                       ...but I digress.


But the country is also hot for another reason:

Singapore is taking the lead as one of Asia’s fastest-growing medical device markets.   It has established itself as a trusted and competitive location for leading medical technology companies to design, test-bed, manufacture and launch innovative products for Asia and beyond. The country has in fact emerged as a leading site in Asia for global medical technology companies to carry out key activities ranging from value engineering and medical device innovation to commercial manufacturing and regional headquarter functions. Currently, there are more than 30 leading biomedical science companies that have established their regional or global headquarters and manufacturing bases here.

To meet the demands of this fast-growing and dynamic market, the trade exhibition on medical technology manufacturing, MEDICAL MANUFACTURING ASIA 2012 is being launched (September 12-14, 2012)!  Jointly organized by Messe Düsseldorf Asia and the Singapore Precision Engineering & Tooling Association (SPETA), the show will be held in conjunction with the long-running trade show duo MEDICAL FAIR ASIA and OS+H Asia.

MEDICAL MANUFACTURING ASIA 2012 will showcase the complete process chain for medical devices, presenting a full comprehensive multitude of components, materials and solutions for the medical engineering industry. The show is expected to attract strong participation from some 150 leading international market leaders from 20 countries as well as 5,000 quality trade visitors from across Asia and beyond.

The exhibition is supported by Messe Düsseldorf in Germany, organizer of COMPAMED, the world’s leading international trade fair for suppliers of the medical manufacturing industry.  And leveraging on Messe Düsseldorf’s expertise in staging the world’s largest and most established medical technology exhibition, MEDICA, the biennial MEDICAL MANUFACTURING ASIA promises to be a key meeting place for industry professionals to network, discover new innovations, learn emerging trends and do business.

It’s a hot opportunity, and perfect excuse to grab a cool Singapore Sling while you’re at it!

Topics: MEDICA, trade show, Messe Düsseldorf, Compamed, Medical Device Manufacturing, Medical Manufacturing Asia, Medical Fair Asia, Singapore, SPETA

Savings Tips for Travel to Doozeldorf

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Tue, Oct 18, 2011 @ 11:33 AM

Our team finally got around to booking our airline tickets to Düsseldorf last week for the upcoming MEDICA & COMPAMED trade fairs.  Based upon the record number of 450+ US companies that will be participating at the show this year, the transatlantic air carriers are probably going to be packing us in during the month of November.  And despite having made this trip uncountable times, we always look forward to traveling over to Germany to provide our clients with the best trade show experience possible!

Also amusing to me is the time I got to Chicago O’Hare and Da Guy behind the check in counter stared back at me and said “dang ders sher alodda people gointa Doozeldorf disafternoon.” [Chicagospeak translation: Good gracious, I’ve observed that there are an unusually high number of our valued customers who are traveling this afternoon to Duesseldorf, Germany.]

pta2       So we all squeeze place ourselves into our seats next to the NFL Wide Receiver and behind the group of 18 squirrely and overly-excited high school exchange students, and off we go to enjoy our in-flight dinner of chicken or pasta and try and get a nap before hitting the ground running and starting a solid week of work, and over-nighting in tiny overpriced hotel  rooms.  
         

Of course I jest, sort of, but truth is – heading to Duesseldorf needn’t be some overpriced chore.  With just a little bit of advance planning, you’ll find that getting there, staying there, and yes – enjoying the local culture after the show closes each evening can be rather enjoyable!

BOOK YOUR AIRFARE

Reaching Düsseldorf by air from the United States and Canada is simple.  The city’s Rhein-Ruhr International Airport is one of Germany’s busiest and most modern.  Nearly 80 airlines offer more than 1,500 flight connections each week from around the world.  Numerous direct flights operate to or from the United States daily.  SAVINGS TIPS:  Shop around, book early, select discount carriers, or book flights that require a transfer at a hub airport. 

BOOK YOUR HOTEL

In general, the earlier you book a hotel room, the better.  Messe Düsseldorf North America's official travel agency is able to provide you with comprehensive and competitively priced hotel arrangements for your trip to Düsseldorf.  SAVINGS TIPS:  Hotels outside of Duesseldorf tend to be less expensive than those within the city itself.  B&B’s (known in Germany as Pensionen) tend to be less expensive than hotels.  And sometimes private residences or corporate apartments are available for rent that can accommodate groups of three or more persons. 

LOCAL TRAVEL

The Düsseldorf subway tramlines U78 and U79, and bus lines 722 and 896, provide service directly to the fairgrounds.  The fairgrounds can also be easily be reached by taxi or private vehicle.  If you plan to drive, take the A44 highway westward from the A3 highway and follow Messe Düsseldorf’s own access road to its large-scale parking lots, equipped with 20,000 parking spaces.  Complimentary shuttle buses will take you from the parking lots to all entrances and back within a few short minutes.  SAVINGS TIPS:  Your exhibitor pass and/or your admission ticket doubles as your ticket for travel within Düsseldorf’s regional public transportation network!

Messe Düsseldorf and the VRR / VRS (Rhine-Ruhr and Rhine-Sieg Regional Public Transportation Network) offer exhibitors and visitors the option of taking the subway, tram, bus, or regional train (2nd class), throughout the entire VRR (and depending on the show, VRS) zones at no additional cost.

As you can see, there are many ways to get there, stay there, and travel around.  Perhaps some of you may have tips and pointers of your own – we’d welcome your comments and tips to share!

Topics: Germany, MEDICA, trade show, Düsseldorf, medical trade show, Travel, Compamed

Badges!? We Don’t Need No Stinkin’ Badges!

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Mon, Jun 6, 2011 @ 16:23 PM

If you recognize this as a line uttered to Humphrey Bogart in the 1948 film Treasure of the Sierra Madre, safe to say you’re a movie fanatic.  More widely recognized, the sentence was spoofed into one of the many memorable and funny throwaway lines in the Mel Brooks’ classic 1974 comedy movie Blazing Saddles.

 

 

 

 

describe the image©1974 Warner Bros.
All Rights Reserved.

The “Badges? We-don’t-need-no-stinkin-badges!”  quote always seemed to illicit a laugh as we tended to the credentialing and distribution of exhibitor and visitor entrance passes for our trade shows at the Duesseldorf fairgrounds.  For until quite recently, our trade shows in Duesseldorf didn’t actually require name badges.  Rather, each exhibitor and visitor was provided with an entrance ticket.  Each ticket was simply that:  an admission ticket with a magnetic stripe on its backside that allowed the card holder to pass thru the turnstiles at the entrances to the fairgrounds.

Name badges, as we know them from trade shows here in the United States and elsewhere, were non-existent.  Exhibitors and visitors alike were coached to bring plenty of business cards to exchange during the event.  Lead retrieval units, therefore, were also non-existent.
 

However as of the beginning of 2011, all that is now starting to change.

Staring this year, Messe Duesseldorf has upgraded its infrastructure, using some of the most modern technologies to streamline and track the show’s attendance demographics better. Each visitor to our trade shows in Duesseldorf now is encouraged to register online and to purchase an entrance pass / name badge.  Each badge now identifies the bearer’s company name clearly on the front side of it, and also contains a distinct bar code that allows the visitor swipe their card as they pass thru the entrances to the show.  Plastic name badge holders are available on-site, so that the badges can be worn.


And of course, these badges also continue the dual purpose of serving as a ticket to ride Duesseldorf’s public transportation network (known as the VRR).

Exhibitors and visitors are still encouraged to bring plenty of business cards, but it is with the hope that eventually these badges will also be used as a proper visitor ID, containing the visitor’s credentials that can be scanned into a lead retrieval unit.  Some of the obstacles that must be sorted out still remain, especially how to reconcile the handling of proprietary personal information against Germany’s strict federal data protection laws.

To be sure this is an important step forward and one that most certainly will be welcomed by many companies that participate at our trade shows!

Topics: trade show, Messe Duesseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, trade fair, Trade Show Planning, Exhibitor Badges, Visitor Badges, Lead Retrieval

1000 Followers Twitter Contest, Win an iPad!

Posted by Daniela Knoll on Mon, Apr 18, 2011 @ 09:22 AM

cute twitter logoWe’ve been very lucky to have all of our clients and business partners, and with Twitter, all of our Followers. To show our appreciation we’re going to give you a chance to win an Apple iPad!

But as we’re not quite at 1,000 followers just yet we are going to use our prize as a bribe. Help us get there. In return we will randomly draw Twitter usernames for our fabulous prize.

Rules:

1.  Must be following @mdnachicago on Twitter.

2.  Must copy and paste the message exactly as it is posted below. Only correct entries will count.


3.  One entry per day for the entire length of the contest. Any more than one will count as just one. Any extra tweets just shows us you love us!


4.  One Twitter account per person. Entering under multiple accounts is strictly prohibited. Those found using multiple accounts will have their usernames with the least amount of entries taken out of the drawing.


5.  Prize cannot be returned or refunded.

Have fun!

You can enter once per day. Every day you tweet this exact message, it increases your chances for the Apple iPad! Here’s how to enter: Copy and paste the following EXACT message into Twitter and tweet it:

Follow @mdnachicago for trade show news, info and list of world leading trade shows! Follow to win an iPad! #mdnaprize http://bit.ly/hWHzh3

The goal for us is to get to 1,000 followers on Twitter, so once we get to it we’ll do the drawing!

The Drawing:

Once the contest has closed, we’ll jot everyone’s usernames down on bits of paper and toss them into a bowl after careful review to ensure the users are following each rule posted above. We’ll do a drawing and post it to the site where everyone can see who won! Once the winner has been posted, we will contact the winner via a Direct Message on Twitter to collect more information. We’ll need your mailing address to send your prize to (and if we’re unable to make contact or collect your shipping information within one week, we’ll re-draw for your prize and give it to someone else). Once your prize has been shipped out, you’ll be notified that it’s on the way.

Good Luck and Thanks for Following!

Topics: trade show, Messe Düsseldorf, trade fair, trade show organizer, contest, iPad, Twitter contest

A Season for "Dibs" - Register Now for MEDICA 2011

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Fri, Feb 4, 2011 @ 10:25 AM

Perhaps many of you heard this past week that Chicago had a little bit of snow.  Actually, a LOT of snow, now tallied as the third largest snowstorm in the city’s history.  Not only did we end up with about 2 feet of the white stuff, we dealt with 60+ mile per hour wind gusts, thunder and lightning, and snow drifts six feet high in some places.  But Chicago is generally prepared and has snow removal down to a science, and for the most part within 24 hours things have returned more or less to normal.

But on the side streets, it will usually take a couple of days before a snow plow will pay a visit and shove mounds of packed snow up against the vehicles parked along the curb.

Now anyone who lives in our fair city is familiar with the concept of “dibs”.  This tradition goes back years, and some of our grizzled old-timers will gather wide-eyed children around the fireplace and tell tales about how it even precedes the great blizzard of '67.

dibs3Photo:  Michael Tercha, Chicago Tribune


Essentially, before a side street is plowed, or even afterwards, the residents shovel out their own parking spots on the street and then save them by routinely placing lawn furniture, buckets, two-by-fours, stools, saw horses (or whatever expendable junk they happen to have on hand) in the valuable space they have just dug out. That means the space now belongs to the excavator.  If you park in a saved spot, you may run some unfortunate risks that could eventually involve your car insurance company.  
Hence:  DIBS.

At many of our trade shows that occur on a frequent basis, especially an annual show like MEDICA for example, an informal variation of dibs also exists.  The number of companies that return to the show from year to year is high, and there is a relatively brief registration window in which companies can submit their exhibit space applications.  Often the amount of space that is requested at MEDICA far exceeds the amount of space available at the convention center.

Returning exhibitors who submit their applications before the deadline often will get priority consideration for the same space that they had during the previous show, followed then by new-to-show exhibitors who also submitted their applications before the registration deadline.  Many times, exhibitors will request an enlargement of their space, or a move to another location if possible.  But of course with 4,000+ exhibitors at MEDICA it all depends on who has returned and who is getting their space back.  Usually the best way to increase the chances of upsizing or relocating is by expressing flexibility about preferred booth dimensions, configuration, or location.

Under all circumstances, Messe Duesseldorf works diligently to try and accommodate everyone’s special requests and space requirements in a fair and equitable manner.

Registration for MEDICA 2011 is now open and runs until March 1, 2011, but it is strongly encouraged that you submit your completed registration forms well in advance of the deadline.  To request your exhibitor registration materials, simply contact us or visit the show’s website, www.medica-tradefair.com, and get your dibs on a booth at the world’s largest and leading medical industry trade fair!

Topics: Germany, MEDICA, medical equipment, medical supplies, trade show, Messe, Messe Duesseldorf, exhibiting, Düsseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, medical trade show, medical trade fair, trade fair, Trade Show Planning, City of Düsseldorf, Chicago, Booth Assignments, Dibs, Snow

New Generation of Packagings: No Chance for Pharmaceutical Counterfeiting

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Mon, Dec 20, 2010 @ 16:06 PM

describe the image Counterfeiting of medication is rapidly increasing. In Germany, one in twenty medications has been tainted. Researchers are therefore developing authenticity seals and security codes intended to make drug packagings uniquely identifiable.
Anyone who buys Sinupret sinusitis pills from pharmaceuticals producer Bionorica will now see on the folding carton a three-dimensional, optically variable, embossed mark, which can be seen in relief when the carton is tilted. Since the herbal medication was so often copied, Bionorica engaged the Munich company Giesecke & Devrient, which specializes in printing bank notes, to design this tangible security feature for Sinupret. Artur Theis, a subsidiary of the Edelmann Group, developed the production process for the new packaging. The mark is printed and embossed by Braun Pharmadruck, also an Edelmann subsidiary. Sinupret, one of the most popular products on the cold treatment market, is just the start: by the end of 2011, Bionorica intends to emboss the packagings of all its product ranges with the new quality seal. “We want to provide the best possible safeguards for pharmacies and users”, says company head Michael Popp.

Producers who have problems with counterfeiters must make their products uniquely identifiable. This is especially true in the pharmaceutical sector. “The danger of counterfeit medication is growing”, states Ulrike Holzgrabe of the German Pharmaceutical Society (DphG). Although producers of pharmaceuticals experience losses amounting to billions of Euros each year through product piracy, this is not the main problem, since counterfeit medications threaten the health or even the lives of unsuspecting patients.

The Internet is a weak spot

According to EU figures, the German customs authorities seized counterfeit medications worth 11.5 million Euros in 2009 – 30% more than in the previous year. In addition, a World Health Organisation (WHO) study claims that even in supposedly safe regions such as Europe and the U.S., up to 10% of all medications are counterfeit. According to Ulrike Holzgrabe, the proportion of such counterfeit products in Germany is about 5%. “But this is just the tip of the iceberg”, she suspects. Mail order business offers criminals the greatest opportunities. This sector is booming, especially in Germany. Marketing research firm ACNielsen estimates that sales of non-prescription drugs increased by a quarter last year. According to the consumer research consultancy company GfK, one in four Germans now obtain medications by mail order. At the same time, it is apparently becoming harder for consumers to distinguish between reputable mail order pharmacies and illegal traders. Test purchases by the Central Laboratory of German Pharmacists confirm counterfeiting rates of 50% for medications sold by illegal Internet pharmacies, for example.

“Producers of pharmaceuticals are therefore more willing to look for methods to provide better security against counterfeiting”, remarks Ulrike Holzgrabe. The companies have two aims: firstly, consumers should be able to verify that they have received an original product; and secondly, experts should be able to identify counterfeits when they do inspections. The most active companies include not only medicinal plant specialist Bionorica but also Bayer Healthcare, whose products are among the most frequently counterfeited worldwide. The company therefore explains on its website www.vorsicht-faelschung.de how patients can distinguish between original Bayer preparations and imitations. In the future, Bayer Healthcare will also provide its medications packagings with counterfeit-proof features. The Leverkusen-based company has also engaged Artur Theis for this project. “Our task is to make the security features suitable for a folding carton production line, and then for series production”, explains Ulrich Doerstelmann, head of the counterfeiting security department at the Edelmann subsidiary.

Based on banknote printing

In Germany, Artur Theis is regarded as the specialist for uncopyable folding cartons. The conditions in its Wuppertal plant, which has been converted into a complete counterfeiting security facility, are the same as those in a banknote printing company: there is strict access control to the production section, the security zones are off-limits for most of the personnel and all processes are exactly documented and archived. The degree of meticulousness is so far unique in the German packaging industry. The result of the cooperation with Bayer Healthcare is a sort of lenticular image that cannot be imitated by counterfeiters. “We combine printing and embossing technology and use UV security inks,” commented Ulrich Doerstelmann.

The EU, however, requires yet another step to be taken by the pharmaceuticals industry to ensure greater patient safety. Industry Commissioner Günter Verheugen announced that in 2011 there will be a standard procedure at EU level in the fight against the counterfeiting of medications. In 2008, the Commission proposed that medication packagings should be protected by a security mark and that in that future it should be possible to retrace their path from the counter back to the factory. The WHO is also a strong supporter of counterfeit-proof labelling. Producers of pharmaceuticals are therefore pushing for the introduction of an electronic proof of origin in form of a track and trace system, with which the complete supply chain can be monitored.

In order to test and demonstrate coding and identification solutions, the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA) launched a pilot project in Sweden in September 2009. For several weeks, medication packagings for 25 pharmacies in the Stockholm region were provided with a two-dimensional data matrix code. This can hold more information than a simple bar code. In the Swedish project, it contained an article number, a batch number, a use-by date and a serial number. At the pharmacy, the code was scanned and compared immediately with an entry in a database. The whole process took only a few seconds, so that counterfeits were immediately identified. Only after this security check did the customer receive the medication. About 100,000 medicacation packagings were tested using this system – with great success, as the EFPIA reported.

Origin checks by scanner

Experts therefore confidently expect the track and trace system to be implemented throughout Europe in the near future. “The EU’s pharmaceuticals package could become law in 2010”, notes Ulrich Dörstelmann. Manufacturers of machinery and systems are well prepared for a switchover. For example, Optima Group Pharma, which specializes in filling and sealing syringes and vials already offers, on request, coordinated track and trace solutions for producers of pharmaceuticals. “Ready-to-use syringes are stored and transported in special syringe nests in plastic boxes referred to as tubs. Our machines label the containers, so that they can be traced at any time”, explains company spokesman Henning Felix. Bosch Packaging Technology, which supplies filling, processing and packaging technology for the pharmaceuticals industry, also has printing and tracing equipment in its portfolio. Bosch product manager Daniel Sanwald explains the function of the printing module as follows: Each minute, up to 400 folding cartons are transported on a conveyor belt at high-speed through a printer, which labels each carton with a data matrix code containing a production number, use-by date and serial number. A camera subsequently checks and verifies the code. The data are finally stored on a high-capacity central server, from which they can always be called up. If a product that cannot be identified in this way turns up in a pharmacy, it must be a counterfeit. “If track and trace becomes mandatory, thousands of production lines will have to be retooled. We can see enormous market potential for our technology”, says Daniel Sanwald. At interpack 2011, the leading international trade fair for the packaging industry, manufacturers of machinery and systems will present their track and trace solutions from May 12 - 18, 2011 in Düsseldorf, Germany.

A security offensive by producers of pharmaceuticals would also increase demand for high quality packaging materials producers. In order to cut costs during the economic crisis, many companies bought packagings and packaging components for their medications in China. The disadvantage is that these products are often of poorer quality, so that dosage sprays, catheters or pumps, for example, may not function correctly or may break more easily. “All those who subscribe to patient safety and who want to send a clear signal that quality is a top priority, will no longer use these products in the future”, says Peter Roesch, head of sales at atomiser pump manufacturer Aero Pump. He can see a large market for his company’s quality products: “We put a high priority on dimensional accuracy and precision, and we invest heavily in quality assurance and innovation. Aero Pump will also present its innovations at interpack 2011.

It is unlikely that pharmaceutical counterfeiters will be attracted by medications that have been provided with a security mark, a code and top quality packaging. However, there are still many obstacles on the path to obtaining maximum patent protection. An enormous investment is required in order to retool packaging lines and this could prevent pharmaceutical companies from acting quickly. Even if the EU rapidly approves its pharmaceutical packages, the implementation process could take years. Another aspect that has yet to be clarified is where all the data associated with a pan-European track and trace system should be stored. Will there be several geographically dispersed servers or one central system? “And then someone must be the owner. This raises the question of who trusts who?” remarks Bosch manager Daniel Sanwald.

Topics: trade show, international business, Düsseldorf, International Trade, International Trade Shows, trade fair, Product Information, packaging, interpack

FPSA and Messe Duesseldorf Form Strategic Alliance

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Wed, Dec 1, 2010 @ 15:22 PM

McLean, Virginia based FPSA (The Food Processing Suppliers Association) is a global trade association serving suppliers in the food and beverage industries. The Association's programs and services support its members by providing assistance in marketing their products and services, overall improvement in key business practices and many opportunities to network among industry colleagues.  Among the association's programs and services to achieve these objectives is PROCESS EXPO, The Global Food Equipment and Technology Show.

Messe Düsseldorf GmbH and The FPSA recently announced the formation of a formal strategic alliance to increase the international reach of PROCESS EXPO as part of interpack’s worldwide product family.

Messe Duesseldorf will aid in the sale of booth space at PROCESS EXPO as well as well as promoting visitor attendance to food processors around the globe.

FPSA and MD shake hands

Pictured from left to right:  Bernd Jablonowski (Project Director, interpack 2011), Hans Werner Reinhard (Executive Vice President, Messe Duesseldorf GmbH), Jan Erik Kuhlmann (President & CEO, Multivac), David Seckman (President & CEO, FPSA).

The renowned interpack trade fair, organized by Messe Duesseldorf, was founded in 1958 and developed over the decades into the number one global platform for the packaging and processing industry.  The last staging of the show in 2008 featured 2,744 exhibitors from 60 nations and attracted 179,000 trade visitors.

“This partnership will significantly increase the presence of PROCESS EXPO in the international market, where Messe Duesseldorf is a leader within the processing and packaging trade show arena,” stated Scott Scriven, Chairman of FPSA. “With 7 international subsidiaries and 68 foreign representatives worldwide supporting Messe Duesseldorf in 127 countries, PROCESS EXPO will have unprecedented access to new markets,” he added.

 “Messe Duessseldorf is pleased to be joining with FPSA in the formation of this partnership. The exponential growth of PROCESS EXPO since the announcement of the move to a biennial show tells us that strategically, this is where we need to be in the North American market. We are now pleased to offer our existing customers a new platform,” added Hans Werner Reinhard, Executive Vice President of Messe Duesseldorf.

PROCESS EXPO will be held November 1-4, 2011 at the McCormick Place Convention Center in Chicago, Illinois.  www.myprocessexpo.com

interpack will return to the fairgrounds in Duesseldorf, Germany May 12-18, 2011.  www.interpack.com

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Valve World Expo

Posted by Ryan Klemm on Fri, Oct 29, 2010 @ 16:04 PM

From abominable snowmen to Indiana Jones - Installation work offers curious and exciting experiences

Valves control lots of things, whether in industrial plants and machines or in a private household. They fulfil their duties as a matter of course and – for most of us – nearly invisibly. However, the stories that can be told about valves are not utterly boring, in some cases they are even real tales of adventure. Installing valves can often be extremely demanding for the technicians – and the valves themselves become “silent” stars.

Two abominable snowmen

Schroeder Valves can tell such as story. The design engineer and manufacturer of pump protection valves, automatic recirculation valves, control valves and throttles has sales offices around the globe. “The products are nearly entirely special designs, which sometimes can be as large as a room or weigh as much as an elephant,” explains Axel Muecher, CEO of Schroeder Valves. Not only are the valves special, but so are the different environments where they are installed. Schroeder Valves, for example, equips snow cannons in many skiing regions with its fittings. It can often happen that an employee has to work at over 3,000 meters altitude. However such work is only worth a weary smile…

“There is one job we’ll certainly never forget,” Axel Muecher remembers. He travelled to the Austrian town of Tauplitz with a colleague to repair a defect bypass in a valve. Heavy snowfall created pretty scenery down in the valley, yet also caused both mechanics to become anxious. They set off in a car fitted with snow chains, yet after driving half of the way the car couldn’t go any further. The customer arranged for a snow cat to bring them up to an altitude of 2,800 meters. Both thought that would be a great idea - until they noticed the snow cat’s cab was already occupied by two other men. “We had no other choice than to sit on the hood,” says Axel Mücher. Sitting outside at minus 10°C, the snow cat drove them one and a half kilometers through a near snow storm to their assignment. On arrival, Muecher and his colleague resembled abnominable snowmen. “And that’s exactly how we felt ourselves.” All is well that ends well – the bypass was repaired!

Installing in the wild

Nonetheless, things can be a lot more spectacular, as Frank Loeffler can tell. The mechanic working for VAG-Armaturen GmbH had to travel 18,000 kilometers to the wild outback of Tasmania. Far away from civilization, Loeffler had to struggle along a mountain, across rocky terrain and through bothersome vegetation to install a shut-off valve for a historical wooden water conduit at a dam. The conduit is a real historical beauty. Back in 1914, the Lyell Mining and Railway Company built a dam for a power station, right at the foot of Lake Margret, near Queenstown and its 2,000 inhabitants. A three kilometer long water conduit was built to supply a mine with electricity and water. Nearly nine decades later the entire construction was shut down temporarily so the wooden conduit could be renovated, because its wood had become porous.

Frank Loeffler wasn’t the only one who had to cope with the rocky path leading to the dam. VAG also had to come up with a way to transport the valve, since there was no road a truck could use to deliver it. A helicopter was the only solution. VAG disassembled the valve into its individual parts, because the 3.5 ton valve would have been too heavy for a helicopter. Body, valve disk and lift cylinder were to be transported to the dam in three flights. To make things worse, neither electricity nor a crane would be available, so exactly what tools, hoisting and alignment gear would be needed for this job had to be determined in advance. Due to bad weather, the flights were delayed several times. Finally, the shut-off valve was delivered. Loeffler now had to work quickly: the body had to be put into position on top of the new plateau anchored in the rock, the extremely heavy valve had to be aligned and the axle bearings installed. Finally, Frank Loeffler was able to install the hydraulic lift cylinder. It was precision work under the most difficult of circumstances, yet the experienced VAG-employee managed it all without problems. “That was an assignment with an adventure as a bonus,” said the mechanic enthusiastically. “I felt just like Indiana Jones!”

A flurry of flashbulbs

Sometimes there is enough excitement for a valve to hit the news. This was the case for large-diameter ball valves made by Schuck Armaturen. After receiving an express order, the company had to deliver ball valves weighing several tons by plane for the first time to Malaysia. A subsidiary of Petronas, the Malaysian oil and gas giant, had ordered ball valves with a diameter of up to 36” for the world’s largest liquid natural gas terminal. The valves had to be able to withstand 118 bars of pressure. Because the delivery period was rather short, a plane had to pick up the bodies in India where they were cast. Despite their weight of 19.5 tons, the valves were flown as air freight from Frankfurt to Malaysia after they had been assembled. Then it was time for the big show – for the first time ever, a Boeing 747 landed at the small airport of Bintulu in the state of Sarawak, a town with a population of 50,000. Reporters and television crews flocked to the event – no one had ever seen a Boeing before. And thus the ball valves became news in Malaysia, amidst a flurry of flashbulbs…

Vital and essential

On the other hand, valves can be a matter of life and death; for instance, for the inhabitants of Prague’s Old Town. Eight years ago, the Czech Republic witnessed the greatest natural disaster in its history. The waters of the flooded Moldau River pressed into Prague’s sewage, the old town was flooded - with fatal consequences. Seventeen people died, 40,000 had to be evacuated, a large portion of the inhabitants were without electricity, half of city’s subway stations were submerged and many animals drowned in the zoo.

In order to prevent such a disaster in the future, the Czech Republic decided to redesign Prague’s sewage system. VAG-Armaturen now ensures the metropolis‘ safety. The company from Germany shipped parallel slide gate valves and a backflow trap with a nominal diameter of DN 600. Both valves were installed right next to the Moldau. “In case of a flood, the flood water is kept from pressing back into the town’s sewage system,” explains Joachim Reichert of VAG. This not only keeps the citizens safe, but also keeps the subterranean pumping chamber from being damaged.

In addition to the automatic backflow flap, VAG also installed a slide gate valve. This security measure makes it possible to close the pipes if the backflow flap doesn‘t function properly. VAG developed this solution in collaboration with Prague’s water company. The result is essential for the city’s survival!

The world is not enough

In different cases however, the world is not enough for some fittings. Space can be a nice place, too. Stoehr rocketed 56 specially-made valves with nominal diameters ranging from DN 15 to DN 200 into space when they were built into South Korean carrier rocket Naro 1. The valves ensure the rocket is fuelled with liquid gases before lift-off and are an utterly vital part of the 30 meter tall and 141 ton heavy rocket with a diameter of 3.90 meters. The parts have to function absolutely precisely, as they ensure the highly complex fuelling process works without any problem whatsoever. Liquid gases, such as liquid oxygen with a temperature of -196°C, have to flow into their tanks in a matter of seconds. Due to security reasons, fuelling on the Naro Space Centre’s launch pad can only take place as part of the take-off process. Thanks to Stoehr, everything went smoothly. In the end, the space mission was not entirely a success, as the satellite was destroyed. An independent commission declared it was due to the nose cone – parts of it were not released as planned. The rocket didn’t make it into orbit.

Insurgents attack

Valves aren’t the only ones living dangerous lives, mechanics can also be exposed to serious dangers. Two employees working for Schroeder Valves found themselves ambushed in India while travelling by train from Calcutta to a steel plant in Raigarh, where they were supposed to give technical support. The journey was originally expected to last 16 hours. After around half the journey the train passed through the Bhalulata station in the state of Orissa. “We were suddenly woken up by a detonation and deafening noise,” one of the two Schroeder employees remembers. Chaos suddenly broke out. “People ran confused, panicking and shouting. We saw smoke rise.” 50 Maoist rebels had blown up the tracks - as well as parts of the train station – and taken railroad staff as hostages.

“Luckily, things went well for us,” says one of the men from Schroeder. Nonetheless, it was far from being a pleasant experience. Due to the attack, the train and both Germans were stuck in the middle of the jungle for an entire day. In the end, the train travelled backwards to the closest station, where they then had to return to Calcutta. The customer had to be helped by email and spare parts delivery.

So don’t say installation work can be a boring affair…

The latest products and technologies for the valve industry will be on display at the Valve World Expo 2010, to be held from November 30 – December 2 at the fairgrounds in Düsseldorf, Germany.

For further information about Valve World Expo 2010, contact us at Messe Düsseldorf North America, 150 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 2920, Chicago, IL 60601. Telephone: (312) 781-5180; Fax: (312) 781-5188; E-mail: info@mdna.com; Visit our web site http://www.mdna.com; Subscribe to our blog at http://blog.mdna.com; Follow us on twitter at http://twitter.com/mdnachicago!

Topics: Announcements, Germany, trade show, international, international business, Düsseldorf, Messe Düsseldorf, International Trade, International Trade Shows, trade fair, City of Düsseldorf, equipment, valve, Valve World Expo